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Thread: Happy Birthday USCG! August 4, 1790

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    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    Default Happy Birthday USCG! August 4, 1790

    Commandantís Coast Guard Day Message
    Wednesday, August 4, 2010


    Shipmates,

    Today, as it is our custom, we celebrate on the 4th day of August, the anniversary of the establishment of our Service.

    The creation of the Revenue Cutter Service closely followed the birth of our Nation. Two hundred and twenty years ago today, or only fourteen years after the date of the Declaration of Independence, President George Washington signed an act of the First Congress providing for the creation of the Revenue Cutter Service.

    While I could use this opportunity to recognize the outstanding work of our Active Duty, Reserve, Civilian and Auxiliary members over the past year in Haiti, Deepwater Horizon and across our many missions, I choose instead to honor your outstanding performance by using this occasion to reflect upon what it means to be a Coast Guardsman.

    As Coast Guard men and women, we share a bond of pride in our rich heritage and a common purpose to uphold our honorable traditions.

    We are defined by unsung heroism and selfless service. We defend our Nation. We risk our lives to save others. We give our utmost when cold, wet and tired. Countless times, we have extended our arm down into the water to rescue those in peril from the sea. We will unhesitatingly extend that same arm to help a shipmate in need.

    Coast Guardsmen are always ready. We perform our security, humanitarian and environmental response missions with an unrelenting sense of pride. When disaster strikes, whether natural or manmade, we are first on scene. We are often the last to depart.

    Coast Guardsmen are agile, adaptable and multi-missioned. Born as revenue cuttermen, lighthouse keepers, steamboat inspectors and surfmen, we have expanded to meet the maritime needs of our Nation. We are still the keepers of the lights, but we also now patrol far more distant waters. We readily go wherever there are important, difficult and dangerous maritime duties to be performed.

    Coast Guardsmen are shipmates; they are family. Though our Service has grown, it is still small enough that we know our shipmates by name. We follow their careers. Their successes and achievements are a matter of interest and pride to the entire Service. This reason is also why it cuts deep when we lose a shipmate. We assemble to carry out the manners of our profession, to grieve their loss and honor their service, and we collectively feel the sorrow. This year has been no exception. We know their names. We know our lost shipmates and we miss them. As the Coast Guardsmanís creed states, we revere that long line of expert seamen who by their devotion to duty and sacrifice of self have made it possible for us to be a member of a Service honored and respected, in peace and in war, throughout the world.

    This is our chosen profession. This is our way. This is what we do. We are privileged to be members of a very unique Service that, due to our collection of missions, and legacy agencies, sometimes defies logic when someone attempts to classify us, or to place a label on us. For this reason, whenever I am asked to describe what I am, I always reply with pride, I am a Coast Guardsman. We are the men and women of the United States Coast Guard, past and present.

    On this Coast Guard day, and for the many that will follow, we will continue to faithfully serve. Stand a taut watch.

    Semper Paratus,

    Admiral Bob Papp
    Commandant

    Coast Guard Compass, the official blog of the U.S. Coast Guard. Please visit the U.S. Coast Guard: http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/index....d-day-message/

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    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    Coast Guard History

    The United States Coast Guard, one of the country's five armed services, is a unique agency of the federal government. We trace our history back to 4 August 1790, when the first Congress authorized the construction of ten vessels to enforce tariff and trade laws and to prevent smuggling. Known variously through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as the Revenue Marine and the Revenue Cutter Service, we expanded in size and responsibilities as the nation grew.

    The service received its present name in 1915 under an act of Congress when the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the Life-Saving Service. The nation then had a single maritime service dedicated to saving life at sea and enforcing the nation's maritime laws. The Coast Guard began to maintain the country's aids to maritime navigation, including operating the nation's lighthouses, when President Franklin Roosevelt ordered the transfer of the Lighthouse Service to the Coast Guard in 1939. In 1946 Congress permanently transferred the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation to the Coast Guard, thereby placing merchant marine licensing and merchant vessel safety under our purview.

    The Coast Guard is one of the oldest organizations of the federal government and, until the Navy Department was established in 1798, we served as the nation's only armed force afloat. We continued to protect the nation throughout our long history and have served proudly in every one of the nation's conflicts. Our national defense responsibilities remain one of our most important functions even today. In times of peace we operate as part of the Department of Homeland Security, serving as the nation's front-line agency for enforcing our laws at sea, protecting the marine environment and our vast coastline and ports, and saving life. In times of war, or at the direction of the President, we serve under the Navy Department.

    http://uscg.mil/history/

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    Coast Guard History

    Frequently Asked Questions

    What is the origin of the saying "You have to go out, but you do not have to come back" ?


    A letter to the editor of the old Coast Guard Magazine, written by CBM Clarence P. Brady, USCG (Ret.), published in the March 1954 issue (page 2), stated that the first person to make this remark was Keeper Patrick Etheridge. Brady knew him when both were stationed at the Cape Hatteras LSS. Brady tells the story as follows:

    "A ship was stranded off Cape Hatteras on the Diamond Shoals and one of the life saving crew reported the fact that this ship had run ashore on the dangerous shoals. The old skipper gave the command to man the lifeboat and one of the men shouted out that we might make it out to the wreck but we would never make it back.

    The old skipper looked around and said, 'The Blue Book says we've got to go out and it doesn't say a damn thing about having to come back.'"
    Etheridge was not exaggerating.

    The Regulations of the Life-Saving Service of 1899, Article VI "Action at Wrecks," section 252, page 58, state that:

    "In attempting a rescue the keeper will select either the boat, breeches buoy, or life car, as in his judgment is best suited to effectively cope with the existing conditions.

    If the device first selected fails after such trial as satisfies him that no further attempt with it is feasible, he will resort to one of the others, and if that fails, then to the remaining one, and he will not desist from his efforts until by actual trial the impossibility of effecting a rescue is demonstrated.

    The statement of the keeper that he did not try to use the boat because the sea or surf was too heavy will not be accepted unless attempts to launch it were actually made and failed [emphasis added], or unless the conformation of the coast--as bluffs, precipitous banks, etc.--is such as to unquestionable preclude the use of a boat."
    This section of the Regulations remained in force after the creation of the Coast Guard in 1915. The new Instructions for United States Coast Guard Stations, 1934 edition, copied Section 252 word for word as it appeared in 1899. [1934 Instructions for United States Coast Guard Stations, Paragraph 28, page 4].

    http://www.uscg.mil/history/faqs/LSSmotto.asp

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    Senior Member Skippy_Doolittle's Avatar
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    Happy Birthday Coast Guard! I did some cross-training with them in 2000 and 2001 in the Gulf (ex-Cdn Navy here) and enjoyed working with them. I wish our own Coast Guard was an enforcement agency at times.

    Skippy.

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    Miss Convicted 2009 SBL's Avatar
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    Happy Birthday and much respect.

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