Page 30 of 40 FirstFirst ... 202223242526272829303132333435363738 ... LastLast
Results 436 to 450 of 592

Thread: SAPS discussion and news

  1. #436
    Senior Member baboon6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Posts
    2,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maktab View Post
    It's good news, though I doubt it'll have much impact. As it has done with the Hawks the ANC will probably just populate the revised unit with its own carefully-picked cadres. It won't make the same mistake that it did with the Scorpions by allowing independent-minded people to lead the unit.
    You're probably right...

  2. #437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by baboon6 View Post
    The SAPS attitude in the last year or so has become increasingly aggressive and confrontational with ordinary citizens going about their business. They seem to have forgotten they are public servants. While I don't have a problem with them being tough on criminals why should the rest of us have to suffer too? I've heard some real horror stories lately.
    The govt put a corrupt thug in charge of the SAPS, declined to do anything about abusive cops like those in the police VIP units and they sent the message down the ranks that both 'shoot first' and 'shoot to kill' were acceptable policy, that ordinary people should be subservient to cops and that the situation was bad enough that the rules and laws didn't matter. Is it any wonder that this happened?

    The South African public is to blame as well though. There have been numerous reports in recent years of cops using torture to extract confessions from suspects, but as long as it was happening to 'criminals' both the newspapers and the general public were content to mostly ignore it. And when Cele emerged with his 'shoot to kill' talk he received a lot of support from many South Africans who believed that it meant he was going be tough on crime. The outrage now is good and I hope it spreads, but we might've been able to avoid some of this if the early warning signs had been heeded.

  3. #438
    Member drevil5000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    517

    Default Affirmative action 'on its head': Solidarity

    Trade union Solidarity on Wednesday said it had won its eighth affirmative action case against the SA Police Service and government in the Labour Court.

    "In terms of a ruling [on Tuesday], two white police members, Emil and Martha Oosthuizen, must be appointed retrospectively in accordance with a settlement reached between Solidarity and the SAPS," spokesman Dirk Hermann said in a statement.

    He said this followed their application for reappointment in 2008, which was denied because their reappointment did not promote representation.

    They both worked as fingerprint experts in the SAPS from 1990 until their resignation in 2006.

    In July 2009 they applied for about 20 positions separately, and were finally reappointed in August 2010.

    Hermann said that in terms of the court order, police records had to be adjusted to show their reappointment date as March 2009.

    "Solidarity is turning the unreasonable way in which affirmative action is implemented in the SAPS and the public service on its head case by case," he said.

    "The test of all these cases is to determine whether the ideology of absolute representivity should be implemented at the expense of service delivery."

    Hermann said that in not one case could the ideology withstand the trial by court.

    The union had won eight consecutive affirmative action cases against the SAPS and government, out of twelve cases brought before the court.

    In one of these cases last year, the court ruled that Captain Renate Barnard be promoted to superintendent.

    Hermann said the SAPS had appealed the ruling and the case would go to the Labour Appeals court on May 4.

    "In our opinion, this case is essential since a higher court will now determine whether affirmative action in South Africa is reasonable or not," Hermann said.
    http://www.timeslive.co.za/local/art...ad--Solidarity

  4. #439
    Senior Member playtym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    9,530

    Default

    I'm not sure if this should be in the photo section, or here, but anyway, here are members of the SAP apprehending a heinous criminal...



    ...whose only crime was that he took their photograph.

  5. #440
    Senior Member playtym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    9,530

    Default

    Cele’s brutal force

    South African police are becoming more brutal by the day, with civil cases against them pushing the contingent liability budget to a whopping R7.5 billion in the last financial year.
    The Sunday Independent reveals today that the sharp spike in brutal action by the police has seen the Independent Complaints Directorate (ICD) investigating three times more severe assault cases last year than in 2001.
    These revelations come as the country celebrates Human Rights Day and against the backdrop of a recent case in which the police have been accused of using excessive force on civilians.
    Last month the police stormed a restaurant in Melville, Joburg, in the early hours and assaulted patrons. The incident was captured on closed circuit TV cameras inside the Catz Pyjamas and it shocked the nation.
    Police researchers and lawyers who specialise in litigating against the police have warned that anecdotal reports of giving electric shocks, suffocation and other apartheid-style torture methods have become more prevalent.
    ICD statistics compiled by a Centre for the Study of Violence (CSVR) and Reconciliation researcher indicate that:
    l Since 2001/02 the number of assault investigations conducted by the ICD has trebled from 255 to 920 in 2009/10. Attempted murder cases it investigated have gone up over seven times from 43 in 2001/02 to 325 in the last financial year.
    l The number of fatal shooting investigations was at an all time high over the past two financial years – at 556 in 2008/09 and 524 in 2009/10. This is compared with 458 in 1997/08, 293 in 2002/03 and an all time low of 281 in 2005/06.
    And policing researchers say the spike in fatal shootings can be traced back to KwaZulu-Natal, where there has been a 173 percent increase in five years – from 75 in 2005/06 to 205 in 2009/10.
    “These statistics raise the question of whether sections of the police in KwaZulu-Natal may have adopted an approach which is defined by the belief that extra- legal methods are not only justified but in fact necessary to address violent crime,” writes David Bruce of the CSVR.
    Police ministry spokesman Zweli Mnisi says Minister Nathi Mthethwa is “extremely concerned about the continuing allegations of police brutality”.
    Mnisi says strengthening ICD legislation is the first step to curbing the problem.
    “We would rather have the police on the ground, fighting crime than in court defending themselves for their alleged abuses of civilians,” said Mnisi.
    Meanwhile the courts are flooded with civil cases against the police that have pushed the contingent liability budget to R2bn more than the 2005/06 financial year when the police were prepared to pay R5.3bn for assault, damage to property, shooting incidents and other “police actions”.
    The police say the amount is deliberately set high, and “not all of it was utilised”. “When you plan for possible lawsuits, it is best to have more in your budget, but
    it does not necessarily imply you will utilise the whole amount. So in cases where it has not been fully utilised or lesser lawsuits were brought against the police, it will then be directed to (other) programmes,” said Mnisi.
    The Sunday Independent has found a number of civil cases lodged in the Johannesburg and Pretoria High courts in which the applicants claim the police assaulted, gave electric shocks, or suffocated them, and they demand compensation.
    The taxpayer carries the burden of paying for the police’s excessive use of force.
    While individual cases are not astronomical, with cost awards added, they can mount up.
    l Edwin Molokomme claims to have been assaulted, suffocated and given electric shocks at the Wierdabrug Police Station in Pretoria, before being “forced to sign an admission statement” on February 7, 2007.
    l Chiza Ndaba claims to have been bundled into the boot of his car by members of the police in Worcester in the Western Cape, kicked repeatedly and pepper-sprayed on March 19, 2008.
    l Isaac Sibiya claims that after his arrest on August 18, 2007 by Vosloorus police in Ekurhuleni, he was beaten so badly he was later hospitalised at the Natalspruit Hospital for over a month.
    l Zipho Ndlovu claims Midrand police hooded him, placed him in a torture position and subjected him to electric shocks on May 27, 2010.
    l Sifiso Makhubu claims the Diepkloof police smothered, sjambokked and shocked him on November 14, 2009.
    While these cases have yet to be tested in court, the ICD is concerned about the resurgence of heavy handed tactics among the police, saying it has received “numerous reports of unwarranted attacks on civilians by police officers attached to special units”.
    “These acts cannot be tolerated in a constitutional democracy. Policing in 2011 should be totally different from the apartheid past that we come from. Police officers should uphold the rule of law and not be the ones accused of breaking it,” said ICD executive director Francois Beukman.
    This came after video footage emerged of police Tactical Response Team (TRT) members barging into Melville bar, the Catz Pyjamas, and assaulting patrons. The ICD says it is investigating the incident along with another, also involving TRT members, which took place at CJs Pub in Hillbrow.
    Wits Law Clinic lawyer Peter Jordi says “there is level of criminality within the police much higher than the police will admit”.
    Jordi has specialised in civil prosecutions against the police for over 25 years and says while he is not against them, he wants “the police to do a good job”.
    “I saw definitely, anecdotally, that there was a lot of torture going on in the early 1990s. This is of ordinary criminal suspects. Then there was a diminution and now torture is definitely back at full throttle. It is happening all over the place. They torture you at the drop of a hat about nothing.”
    Bruce, who studied ICD statistics from as far back as 1997, says statistics of fatalities in police custody are the most reliable and concerning.
    He believes there could be hundreds more incidents of common assault at the hands of the police which are not being reported.


    IN THE GRIP: Police brutality at Northgate Mall after an armed robbery at two cellphone shops. The person being manhandled is the brother-in-law of a man who was shot and wounded by the criminals.


    Police wrestle Pretoria News chief photographer Masi Losi to the ground moments after he started taking pictures of them arresting a suspected thief outside the newspaper's office in Vermuelen Street.
    I don't remember seeing any new legislation making it illegal to take photographs of SAPS members, but I may have just missed it. Would one off the SAPS members care to comment on whether this is now the case?

  6. #441

    Default

    Not only is it perfectly legal to take photographs of SAPS members in public, but the Police Standing Orders specifically instruct police officers to assist journalists who are covering public incidents. See Sanef's statement on the arrests of journalists for more.

    Once again the police are making up laws to suit themselves.

  7. #442
    Member curious george's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eastern Cape.RSA
    Posts
    357

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by playtym View Post
    I'm not sure if this should be in the photo section, or here, but anyway, here are members of the SAP apprehending a heinous criminal...



    ...whose only crime was that he took their photograph.
    While they were busy doing ......???

  8. #443
    Member curious george's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eastern Cape.RSA
    Posts
    357

    Cool

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bocmVZXXY8w

    This sadly a very good representation of these types of cops!(apologies to the 20% of you that are real policemen)

    The intro kinda says it all:

    " all suspects are guilty,period!otherwise they wouldnt be suspects would they!"

  9. #444
    Senior Member playtym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    9,530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by curious george View Post
    While they were busy doing ......???
    While they were busy attending a court case where someone is being charged with assault after he spilled a few drops of whiskey, which landed near our Mr President Jacob Zuma, while he was attending the Durban July last year.

    There's a scan of the journalist assault article here.

    There's a scan of the whiskey assault story here.

  10. #445
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    4,050

    Default

    Blue Light police scare me...

  11. #446
    Senior Member playtym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    9,530

    Default

    Cops damage Krejcír's neighbour's house

    Johannesburg - The Hawks caused an estimated R100 000 damage on Tuesday night when they raided the wrong house.
    The police's elite unit, which investigates priority crimes, raided a house they thought belonged to fugitive Czech millionaire, Radovan Krejcír.

    They quickly realised they had raided 54 Kloof Road in Bedfordview, instead of 54A.

    Alphius Matshavha, 44, an employee who lives at 54 Kloof Road, said on Wednesday that he and another employee, Christina Modutoane, 48, woke up at about midnight on Tuesday to the sound of stun grenades, a helicopter, an armoured vehicle and several police officials rushing onto the premises.

    Scared

    "When I woke with a fright and heard the noise outside, I was very scared. I didn't move. I was too scared they would shoot and kill me."
    Simon Guidetti, 35, Krejcír's neighbour and the owner of the house which the Hawks had accidentally raided, said he wasn't home at the time. He added that Modutoane would probably have to go for counselling, because she was suffering from shock.
    "My property was destroyed after they damaged the front gate, the garage door, front door and ransacked every room in the house.
    "They even ripped the security gates inside the house out of the walls," said Guidetti.
    When the Hawks realised their mistake, they used ladders to climb over Guidetti's boundary wall and gain access to Krejcír's premises. Krejcír wasn't home. They wanted to arrest him on murder and fraud charges.

    Apathetic

    "The commander of the Hawks had an apathetic attitude about what had happened and said they would sort everything out today (Wednesday). But he didn't show up for our planned 11:00 meeting at my house," said Guidetti.

    He said the damage to his property could be more than R100 000, and he reported the incident to the Bedfordview police station.
    Hawks spokesperson McIntosh Polela said they would reimburse Guidetti for the damages as soon as he made a claim.
    "This kind of misunderstanding happens regularly but on the positive side, we got access faster to Krejcír's house," said Polela.
    Polela said his commander was too busy to meet with Guidetti because they hadn't got "their man" on Tuesday night and were busy looking for him.
    Eish!

  12. #447
    Senior Member playtym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    9,530

    Default

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0LU7PsHMHM

    I guess the picture at the end of the video where they're climbing over the wall with the ladders is after they realised they were at the wrong house.

  13. #448
    Senior Member playtym's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    9,530

    Default

    Violence on tape confirms police tactics

    A cellphone video clip showing the South African Police Service's tactical response team (TRT) abusing a man in Wesselton township has lent credence to widespread claims of police brutality during service delivery protests in the township last month.

    The 26-second video, shot in the Wesselton's Thusi section on February 16, two days after the protests began, shows a young man rolling on the ground while being trailed by armed TRT members, one of whom is perched on the police vehicle's bonnet. According to the man who captured the footage on his cellphone, the youngster in the clip was coming from the nearby shops with a female friend when he was summoned to the officers' vehicle, questioned and allegedly shot at several times with rubber bullets.

    He was then forced to roll on the dusty street for a considerable distance. Except for the marked white BMW cruising behind the police officers and their victim, the streets appear lifeless, suggesting that reports of curfews and intimidation by police were not exaggerated. "They didn't want anybody on the streets that day," said the film's source, who asked to remain anonymous. "That guy wasn't the only one [who was assaulted]. A lot of people were being ejected from shops and forced to roll on the ground. My brother was sjambokked."

    Dumisani Mahaye, who was widely quoted in the press during the uprisings and was arrested on February 20 for public violence, said that on February 16, the day the footage was shot, protests had died down as people felt that their outrage had been communicated. Residents were also expecting the arrival of police commissioner General Bheki Cele, who visited Wesselton on that day.

    Earlier that week more than 160 tactical response members were deployed to the township. "People were tired [because of the preceding two days of protests] but the police were out in full force, shooting anyone they saw on the streets with rubber bullets," said Mahaye. "They were also conducting door-to-door raids. In one incident they even arrested an 80-year-old woman, who is appearing in court with us next Monday."

    Paid to initiate riots
    When Mahaye was arrested on February 20, he said, he was interrogated about his role in the protests, tortured and forced to sign statements implicating ANC provincial executive committee members Lassy Chiwayo and Fish Mahlalela as the pair who had paid him to initiate the riots. In a report in City Press last Sunday, Independent Complaints Directorate (ICD) spokesperson Moses Dlamini confirmed that the institution was investigating complaints by Chiwayo and Mahlalela, who are political adversaries of Mpumalanga premier David Mabuza.

    In spite of the widespread claims of torture many of the victims and detainees have not lodged complaints with the ICD, the Mpumalanga branch of which is based in Nelspruit, about 170km from Ermelo. Many cite a lack of resources as the reason, while others say that they have no confidence in the ICD.

    Mahaye said that he had laid complaints of assault, damage to property and being forced to make a statement only because someone had given him a lift on Thursday. Mpumalanga SAPS provincial spokesperson Brigadier Lindela Mashigo said the TRT was deployed following damage to property and attacks on the media and on the police, which had resulted in the hospitalisation of an SAPS member.

    Mashigo said police management was concerned about the video and was investigating to determine the authenticity of the footage. "If found to be true, corrective action will be taken against the member(s) involved as captured on the clip. The individual subjected to this unacceptable behaviour is urged to come forward to lay a complaint or approach the ICD."

    The amateur footage coincides with media reports that so-called third-degree methods by the SAPS are on the increase. The Sunday Independent reported last weekend that in 2009-2010 the ICD investigated 920 severe assault cases, compared with 255 in 2001-2002. The report said that the number of fatal shootings investigated rose to a record high of 556 in 2008-2009, from 281 in 2005-06. The statistics were compiled by Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation researcher David Bruce.

    In a report titled "An Acceptable Price To Pay?" Bruce reports that the ICD secured 63 murder convictions between 2002-2003 and 2008-2009, 18 convictions for assault with grievous bodily harm and 12 convictions for common assault. The total number of convictions obtained for murder or culpable homicide over the six years in question represents roughly 3,6% of deaths in police hands in that period.

    At least two people were killed during the uprisings in Ermelo in February. Police have confirmed that the shooting of Solomon Madonsela during a protest is being investigated by the ICD.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwBJ90E58KE

  14. #449
    Senior Member baboon6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Posts
    2,217

    Default

    SA ranks high in cyber crime

    http://www.news24.com/SciTech/SA-ran...ime-20110327-2

    Johannesburg - Over the past three years more than R1bn is estimated to have been lost in South Africa owing to cyber crime.

    Information Security Group (ISG) of Africa founder and chairperson Craig Rosewarne said the R1bn was a conservative estimate, based on figures in the public domain.

    Rosewarne said because no law or regulation currently forced companies to report cyber crimes, the true scope of the situation in South Africa was uncertain.

    Data that are available are limited, but show that in an international context South Africa has a serious cyber-crime problem.

    According to the February 2011 figures from the RSA Anti-Fraud Command Centre, South Africa was, after America and Britain, the country experiencing the greatest volume of phishing attempts (7.5% of the total).

    The 2010 report by the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) put South Africa sixth on its list of countries with the greatest numbers of individual cyber-crime complainants.

    Rosewarne said that one might imagine that what was happening around us would be a call to action, but what one saw was the opposite. One got a sense of lethargy, of dragging one's feet and bureaucratic red tape.

    The Department of Communications previously published a draft cyber-security policy for public comment, and interested parties could comment up to March 20 last year.

    Rosewarne said the document had said all the right things about a coordinated cooperative effort between government and business to counter cyber crime, but, with all the changes taking place at the Department of Communications, it appeared that nothing further had happened.

    Currently, individuals or enterprises that were victims of cyber crime had to deal with the matter themselves, said Rosewarne.

    This meant they had to lay a charge with the police, in many cases with constables with no knowledge of technical internet terms, who then referred it to the commercial crimes unit in Pretoria, after which it was passed on to the cyber-crime unit.

    The process could be quite extended and, by the time the case enjoyed proper attention, any money stolen had already passed through several accounts, he said.
    I knew there were problems of this kind in SA but didn't know cyber-crime here was amongst the worst in the world.

  15. #450
    Senior Member baboon6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Posts
    2,217

    Default

    Ranks issue in court

    http://www.iol.co.za/sundayindepende...ourt-1.1048089

    Police union Popcru says the decision to introduce “military” ranks to the SA Police Service could make police regress to the sort of “corrupt, ill-disciplined and unaccountable” structure seen during apartheid. The union has filed papers in the Pretoria High Court in an application seeking an order declaring the rank changes introduced by Minister of Police Nathi Mthethwa and National Police Commissioner Bheki Cele unlawful.
    In April last year police announced an overhaul of their ranking structure, with Cele taking on the title of general.
    At the time, police leaders said the intention was to crack down on violent and organised crime.
    However, Police and Prisons Civil Rights Union (Popcru) has argued that the new rank structure flies in the face of an ANC resolution to demilitarise the police and warns that civilian rights could be trampled on as a result of a change in mentality among officers.
    In papers filed at the court, the police say the need for discipline was the main reason for the change in rank structure.
    However, the union says the change is unconstitutional: Section 199 of the constitution said “the defence force is the only lawful military force in the Republic”.
    “While I accept there is a need for effective discipline in the SAPS, I deny that there is a rational connection between military ranks and effective discipline, such that the former is capable of promoting the latter,” Popcru secretary general Nkosinathi Theledi says in papers.
    “During the apartheid era, the SA Police was a highly militarised institution. It was also profoundly corrupt, ill-disciplined and unaccountable.”
    Referring to the 1995 ANC policy paper entitled “Policing the Transition: Transforming the Police”, Theledi says, “It was precisely in order to break with the ‘soldiers at war’ mindset and to build a police service that was democratic and accountable that demilitarisation of the police was such a crucial part of ANC policy”.
    In his affidavit he also refers to a 103-page report by Washington-based think tank The Cato Institute, which warns against the militarisation of police.
    The study, Overkill: The rise of paramilitary police raids in America, says the most obvious problem with the militarisation of civilian policing is that the police and military have two distinctly different tasks.
    “The military’s job is to seek out, overpower and destroy the enemy. Though soldiers attempt to avoid them, collateral casualties are accepted as inevitable.
    “Police, on the other hand, are charged with ‘keeping the peace’, or ‘to protect and serve’,” writes policy analyst and researcher Radley Balko.






    “Given civilian police now tote military equipment, get military training and embrace military culture and values, it shouldn’t be surprising when officers begin to act like soldiers, treat civilians like combatants, and tread on private property as if it were part of a battlefield,” Balko says.
    In recent weeks, cellphone and CCTV footage has surfaced of police Tactical Response Team (TRT) members assaulting restaurant patrons in raids.
    Footage has also surfaced showing heavily armed TRT members forcing an Ermelo resident to roll on the ground on a dusty section of road, while they follow on foot and in a police vehicle.
    Last week the Independent Complaints Directorate said it had noted “numerous reports of unwarranted attacks on civilians by police officers attached to special units, especially the Tactical Response Teams, with concern. Such reports range from assault to torture and even murder.”
    The ICD said it was investigating these complaints and said 15 TRT and Crime Intelligence members in KwaZulu-Natal had been arrested for murder in November 2010.
    The Balko paper makes a case for a clear separation between military and policing methods and training.
    “To put it most bluntly, in its most basic iteration military training is aimed at killing people and breaking things… Police forces on the other hand… have to exercise studied restraint that a judicial process requires.”
    Quoting various excerpts of the Balko paper, Theledi argues that when the “language, designation and culture of a police service become increasingly militarised it is not unreasonable to expect that some officers – especially when under stress – will start behaving as if they are in the military”.
    In responding papers, head of the personnel services division, Lieutenant-General Johannes Phahlane, denies that the new ranks are military in nature and says the union has failed to prove that military ranks have been introduced.
    Phahlane argues that the current police ranks differ from those of the defence force and says Mthethwa is empowered under the SAPS act to make changes to regulations.
    “The ranks/rank structure introduced by the 2010 Regulation are not the sole preserve of the military.
    “There is nothing… in law that prevents the SAPS or, for that matter, any other organisation, from using the ranks introduced by the 2010 Regulation,” Phahlane says.
    In explaining the reasons for the change, Phahlane says that “after experiencing and observing the operation of the rank system introduced by the 1995 amendment, the government took stock of how effectively the new rank structure contributed to the disciplined performance and operations of the SAPS.
    “It was observed that there was not the desired culture of discipline and the smooth function of the required chain of command.”
    The police argue that institutions such as the Independent Complaints Directorate, community policing forums and the Secretariat for the Police would ensure the police remained accountable to the South African public.
    No trial date has been set.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •