Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Finnish Plywood Tents

  1. #1

    Default Finnish Plywood Tents

    These seems to have been quite popular among the troops at such times when canvas tents were not practical and permanent dugouts were still under construction. VII Corps' HQ report from 5 January 1943 recommend that they should be soaked in tall oil before use. Smaller tents were also manufactured from cardboard.

    Here you will find manual for one of the models manufactured by O.Y Wilh. Schauman A.B during the World War Two.
    http://digi.lib.helsinki.fi/pienpain...45&language=en


  2. #2
    Pining for a custom title PEMM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ruˊvnjargg
    Age
    25
    Posts
    8,627

    Default

    Yeah, this thing weights only 400-650kg:s...

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jippo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    6,214

    Default

    I think that thing would be sturdy and comfortable enough to be use as temporary housing in earthquake, or other, disaster areas. I wonder if it could be re-invented for a such purpose.

  4. #4
    the internet is serious business! Ought Six's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Profane in spirit if not in word
    Posts
    21,328

    Arrow

    It is like a yurt, but with plywood instead of fabric over a lattice framework. As for disaster housing, yurts would be much more practical. Big sheets of plywood are heavy and difficult to ship.

    http://www.yurts.com/

    http://www.nomadshelter.com/

    http://rainieryurts.com/

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jippo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    6,214

    Default

    500kg's is not much weight for semi-permanent housing for 22 persons. Also such a shelter is very easy to put up without any tools

    We do have a rather good tent of similar size weighing 50kg (something like that), but I wouldn't see that as a good alternative for the plywood shelter.

  6. #6
    Μολὼν λαβέ Hollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Stuck in the rain and mud again.
    Posts
    23,250

    Default

    One advantage of plywood over a canvas tent is insulation quality. Depends on where and why the shelter is needed, which one would be better.

  7. #7
    the internet is serious business! Ought Six's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Profane in spirit if not in word
    Posts
    21,328

    Arrow

    J:
    "500kg's is not much weight for semi-permanent housing for 22 persons. Also such a shelter is very easy to put up without any tools"
    Given the same size, yurts are lighter. They are very easy to put up. They are in long bundles, like large tents, when shipped, instead of massive, heavy, flat sheets. They offer superior insulation compared to plywood. They are an extremely efficient form of portable long-term temporary housing in harsh weather, which is precisely what Mongolian nomads developed them for. Now that modern materials are available, they are just that much better.

    Those plywood sheet in the picture have to be at least 7'x7'. They would have to be specially manufactured, or two 4'x8' standard sheets would have to be joined together with more lumber, increasing the weight and cost, and reducing the strength of the shelter.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ought Six View Post
    J:Given the same size, yurts are lighter. They are very easy to put up. They are in long bundles, like large tents, when shipped, instead of massive, heavy, flat sheets. They offer superior insulation compared to plywood. They are an extremely efficient form of portable long-term temporary housing in harsh weather, which is precisely what Mongolian nomads developed them for. Now that modern materials are available, they are just that much better.
    A blueprint and material list from internet, a trip to the nearest place that sells some 2x4 and plywood etc add a few handheld tools. Pack it in whatever works the best to get to the location.
    Yurts have to be shiped from some storage and I dont see that big differens between them and ordinary tents.

  9. #9
    Senior Member LineDoggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    38S MB 3661/8351
    Posts
    32,974

    Default

    We would call that a Shed.............

  10. #10
    Senior Member rhino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    I Stand On A Rock Of Jesus Christ+
    Posts
    15,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ought Six View Post
    J:Given the same size, yurts are lighter. They are very easy to put up. They are in long bundles, like large tents, when shipped, instead of massive, heavy, flat sheets. They offer superior insulation compared to plywood. They are an extremely efficient form of portable long-term temporary housing in harsh weather, which is precisely what Mongolian nomads developed them for. Now that modern materials are available, they are just that much better.

    Those plywood sheet in the picture have to be at least 7'x7'. They would have to be specially manufactured, or two 4'x8' standard sheets would have to be joined together with more lumber, increasing the weight and cost, and reducing the strength of the shelter.

    I could be wrong but yurts are made of animal skin, PETA would have a field day

  11. #11
    the internet is serious business! Ought Six's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Profane in spirit if not in word
    Posts
    21,328

    Arrow

    z_b:
    "Yurts have to be shiped from some storage and I dont see that big differens between them and ordinary tents."
    Tents are made from a layer of ripstop nylon, canvas, or other material. Yurts are made from thick high-tech fabric that lasts several decades and has a better insulation factor than most insulated wood-frame standard homes. Because the circular yurt wall is backed by lattice, it is both strong and flexible, and unlike a tent have withstood hurricane force winds when anchored down properly. Yurts are in no way, shape or form just a fancy tent.

    Living in one of those plywood shelters would in fact be living in an uninsulated plywood shed.

  12. #12

    Default

    Actually many hundreds or thousands of these were sold to Germans for use in Northern Finland and Lapland.

  13. #13

    Default

    Few lines from German High Command manual "Taschenbuch fr den Winterkrieg" (1942). Quoted as translated in the English version "German Winter Warfare".

    22. Plywood shelters
    Plywood shelters (Sperrholzzelte or Finnenzelte) are intended as substitutes for cloth tents. The general-issue prefabricated plywood shelter consists of the
    following parts:

    12 rectangular wall boards
    12 triangluar roof boards
    1 support pole
    1 box containing 72 bolts, wing nuts, and washers.
    1 mounting ring.
    1 ventilation hood in two parts, with 4 rods and 8 wedges

    [The German manual, though it gives instructions for assembling the shelter, gives neither its dimensions nor its capacity. However, in another German document entitled "Supplement 2, Enclosure to Army Regulation 319/1" appears a detailed description and drawings of a plywood shelter large enough for 20 men (fig. 34). It is either the shelter referred to in the "Handbook on Winter Warfare" or one of a very similar pattern, and therefore the dimensions and drawings are included here. The dimensions are as follows:

    Inside diameter ... Approximately 18 feet.
    Height of wall ... Approximately 5 feet.
    Height in center ... Approximately 7 feet.

    The document states that when several of the shelters are erected, they must be spaced at least 16 feet apart. It also recommends that the roof are treated with waterproof preparations, such as tar and bitumen, and that the shelters should be insulated against the cold with layers of leaves, branches, or packed snow. In situations where there is danger of enemy fire, earth should be banked around the shelters. The document recommends leaves or twigs as a substitute if lumber is not available for flooring. The shelters are heated with stoves placed on stones bases.]

    At least two man are required to erect the shelter; if possbile, four men should be used. The wall boards, the door and the window frames are laid out on the ground and arranged in proper order. The wall boards are then erected one at a time and screwed together. The bolts are inserted from the outside, and the wing nuts fastened from the inside. Do not forget the washers. The mounting ring is set on top of the support pole, which is held upright by one man. Four roof boards are put in by fitting the holes at their tapered ends over the pegs of the mounting ring. The crosspiece near the outer edge of each roof board is fitted against the inside of the corresponding wall board. The roof boards are screwed down with wing nuts which are inserted from the inside of the tent. When four roof boarrds have been installed, the man holding the support pole may let it go and assist with the rest of the work. When all roof boards have been screwed tight, the support pole and the mounting ring are removed and the ventilation hood is installed. The shelter is taken down in exactly the reverse order.

  14. #14

    Default

    The other Finnish plywood tent model as sold to the Germans.
    http://www.lapinkansa.fi/cs/Satellit...ame=LKAWrapper


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •