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Thread: Russian Armed Forces News & Discussion thread

  1. #8341
    Senior Member Flamming_Python's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anduriel View Post
    Actually, An-124 can and likely will survive crisis. Ulyanovsk acutally did produce them befor thus it have all necessary documentation for it. The plan was to upgrade and strengthen it for loads of 150 ton, install new avionics. The main problem part it's engine. Russia now doesn't have high-bypass turbofan with thrust 20t+ in production. Thus there were plans to buy D-18T mod 3 engines from Ukraine. But it's not possible now. Additinally Volga-Dnepr was lobbying prospect of re-eniginig An-124 with comparable 30-t engines from abroad - Rolls-Roys or PW, but cunningly at the expense of MoD. So until PD-30 (or how would it be called) engine based on gas generator from NK-32 will be built we don't see new An-124. But likely older Ans will have upgraded electronics but old fuselage and engines.
    At this point I'm not even sure that Antonov itself would survive the crisis. It has every chance of declaring insolvency, laying off its workers and selling off its equipment; as 90% of its contracts and projects are now in jeopardy.
    The only thing that's really ready and survivable are those An-140s being built in Iran and Kazakhstan. The one in Samara, Russia, though could possibly end up getting replaced with a Il-114 production line.

    How on earth can the An-124 survive the current crisis; if no-one is building them, and haven't built them since the USSR collapsed?
    The only possible partner for construction was Russia. I believe the production was scheduled to be set up in Russia too. Russia itself, would have also served as the flagship customer.

    The Ukrainian MoD itself doesn't need this aircraft, although that's a moot point because even if it did; it wouldn't be able to afford placing orders for it anyway.

    Antonov setting up a production line will require huge investment. Russia will not set one up with Antonov, if parts from the Ukraine are used, or if the plane is reliant on anything in the Ukraine, because that means that production could be held hostage by more political drama.
    If like you said, it's possible for Russia and Antonov to cut a deal with production wholly in Russia, then great - but perhaps the Ukrainian government would have something to say about that.

  2. #8342
    Member Anduriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamming_Python View Post
    At this point I'm not even sure that Antonov itself would survive the crisis. It has every chance of declaring insolvency, laying off its workers and selling off its equipment; as 90% of its contracts and projects are now in jeopardy.
    The only thing that's really ready and survivable are those An-140s being built in Iran and Kazakhstan. The one in Samara, Russia, though could possibly end up getting replaced with a Il-114 production line.

    How on earth can the An-124 survive the current crisis; if no-one is building them, and haven't built them since the USSR collapsed?
    The only possible partner for construction was Russia. I believe the production was scheduled to be set up in Russia too. Russia itself, would have also served as the flagship customer.

    The Ukrainian MoD itself doesn't need this aircraft, although that's a moot point because even if it did; it wouldn't be able to afford placing orders for it anyway.

    Antonov setting up a production line will require huge investment. Russia will not set one up with Antonov, if parts from the Ukraine are used, or if the plane is reliant on anything in the Ukraine, because that means that production could be held hostage by more political drama.
    If like you said, it's possible for Russia and Antonov to cut a deal with production wholly in Russia, then great - but perhaps the Ukrainian government would have something to say about that.
    Ukraine can't say a lot about it (production of An-124 in Russia), since it's not only Ukraine's plane. An-124 is Soviet aircraft, thus any of Soviet Republics have equal rights over it. What Ukraine actually holds right over is paper blanks/manuals on repair of this plane (they were written after fall of USSR) and, of course, Construction Bureau support. But such issues can be solved by the same Ilyushin, which is in far better state, both in Engineering and R&D. Additionally, Ilyushin can offer current ANTK workers with necessary knowlege a far better deal.

  3. #8343
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamming_Python View Post
    I believe that both the Japanese and Koreans learned from and produced European-derived designs before branching out with their own
    Not so much with the aircraft industry, which was actually purposefully killed in Japan after the WWII. Even their civil aircraft industry didn't survive, as their last commercially successful airliner was YS-11, a last brainchild of late, great Jiro Horikoshi — which first flew in 1962. Since then it was basically reduced to license (and in many cases — screwdriver) production of foreign designs. It started to recover only recently, and their only success so far was the sale of ShinMeiwa US-2 to India as maritime patrol aircrafts. MRJ is only in prototype stage, and IMO it's unlikely to find an export success, given that it's actually somewhat inferior to many existing offerings.

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