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Thread: Life inside the US WWII internment camps

  1. #16
    Moderator James's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattfink View Post
    1. I would agree and even add the forced relocation of native tribes to reservations.
    2. I can not know for sure but the cartoon looks like satire to me.
    We also kept blacks as slaves for several hundred years, and stepped on their civil rights until about 50 years ago.

  2. #17
    Platinum Member Rattfink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    We also kept blacks as slaves for several hundred years, and stepped on their civil rights until about 50 years ago.
    Yes but I didn't mention it b/c LD already had.

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    Last of the Mohicans boone's Avatar
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    We had internment camps here in Canada too. Mostly in the Kootenays and in northern BC. Places like New Denver and Greenwood.
    My maternal grandfather was great friends with a lot of Japanese-Canadian fishermen and always extolled their skill at fishing and boat building.
    After they got shipped off, auctions were held to sell off the internees possessions. My Grandfather bought all his J-C friend's fishboats for pennies-on-the dollar, had them dragged up the hill and stored them on his land.
    After everyone returned from the war, in one way or another, he sold the boats back to their rightful owners for exactly what he had paid for them. In most cases less than 5 dollars.
    My family and many Japanese-Canadian families enjoy deep friendships to this day because of my grandfather's indignation at the treatment they received at the hands of an ignorant gov't and an excitable populace.

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    Moderator James's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post
    We had internment camps here in Canada too. Mostly in the Kootenays and in northern BC. Places like New Denver and Greenwood.
    My maternal grandfather was great friends with a lot of Japanese-Canadian fishermen and always extolled their skill at fishing and boat building.
    After they got shipped off, auctions were held to sell off the internees possessions. My Grandfather bought all his J-C friend's fishboats for pennies-on-the dollar, had them dragged up the hill and stored them on his land.
    After everyone returned from the war, in one way or another, he sold the boats back to their rightful owners for exactly what he had paid for them. In most cases less than 5 dollars.
    My family and many Japanese-Canadian families enjoy deep friendships to this day because of my grandfather's indignation at the treatment they received at the hands of an ignorant gov't and an excitable populace.
    Good on your grandad. If he's still with us, please tell him thank you and well done. If not, I'm still grateful.

    Godspeed.

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post
    We had internment camps here in Canada too. Mostly in the Kootenays and in northern BC. Places like New Denver and Greenwood.
    My maternal grandfather was great friends with a lot of Japanese-Canadian fishermen and always extolled their skill at fishing and boat building.
    After they got shipped off, auctions were held to sell off the internees possessions. My Grandfather bought all his J-C friend's fishboats for pennies-on-the dollar, had them dragged up the hill and stored them on his land.
    After everyone returned from the war, in one way or another, he sold the boats back to their rightful owners for exactly what he had paid for them. In most cases less than 5 dollars.
    My family and many Japanese-Canadian families enjoy deep friendships to this day because of my grandfather's indignation at the treatment they received at the hands of an ignorant gov't and an excitable populace.

    Good story, well done on your grandfather's part.

  6. #21
    Senior Member LineDoggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattfink View Post
    Interesting. It seems he did in fact have no qualms at depicting Japanese in a racist manner but at the same time he seemed to want to promote the hiring of blacks.
    Attachment 173219
    Because that was the Official FDR administration position- Japanese werent to be trusted, but Blacks could build armaments

  7. #22
    Senior Member IDF_TANKER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post
    We had internment camps here in Canada too. Mostly in the Kootenays and in northern BC. Places like New Denver and Greenwood.
    My maternal grandfather was great friends with a lot of Japanese-Canadian fishermen and always extolled their skill at fishing and boat building.
    After they got shipped off, auctions were held to sell off the internees possessions. My Grandfather bought all his J-C friend's fishboats for pennies-on-the dollar, had them dragged up the hill and stored them on his land.
    After everyone returned from the war, in one way or another, he sold the boats back to their rightful owners for exactly what he had paid for them. In most cases less than 5 dollars.
    My family and many Japanese-Canadian families enjoy deep friendships to this day because of my grandfather's indignation at the treatment they received at the hands of an ignorant gov't and an excitable populace.
    That's a wonderful story, Boone. It's always inspiring to hear about someone having strength and wisdom not to succumb to a common madness.

    Also:


  8. #23
    Not Goat Roping Shermbodius's Avatar
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    That's a wonderful story, Boone. It's always inspiring to hear about someone having strength and wisdom not to succumb to a common madness.
    X2 Great story and thanks for sharing.

  9. #24
    No Good Bloody Seppo California Joe's Avatar
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    Props to Grandpa boone.

    Bugs Nips the Nips...Not your average Saturday morning cartoon...

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    Hmm, imagine if war breaks out of between US and China.

    That's gonna be a big headache.

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    Platinum Member Rattfink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rakki View Post
    Hmm, imagine if war breaks out of between US and China.

    That's gonna be a big headache.
    I'm not sure what you mean. Do you mean to imply that we would force American citezins of Chinese ancestry into camps? I hope we have learned from our past. Can you clarify?

  12. #27
    smartypants clean's Avatar
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    Nice Boone. My ex mother-in-law was born in a camp. Her father had built up quite an empire in Los Angeles before the war. As they were being interned, he gave his trusted friends and neighbors family valuables. They said they'd hold onto them for him, but sold them as soon as he was gone and pretended not to know him when they got released.

    At one time he had the biggest department store west of the Mississippi. But in the end, he was shot and killed by gang members while working at his liquor store in south LA.

  13. #28
    Senior Member harryc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattfink View Post
    1. I would agree and even add the forced relocation of native tribes to reservations.
    2. I can not know for sure but the cartoon looks like satire to me.
    Not at all satire (unfortunately).

    [SIZE=3]Dr Suess goes to war,[/SIZE] great book (he was a political cartonist for a communist newspaper), shows clearly his hatred of faschism, Jim crow, and ... his totally going along with the yellow menace. The book postulates that for an East coast liberal the Japanese relocation just wasn't real or immediate, not like Jim crow.

  14. #29
    Senior Member harryc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattfink View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean. Do you mean to imply that we would force American citezins of Chinese ancestry into camps? I hope we have learned from our past. Can you clarify?
    Back after the US and Chinese pilots were bumping planes (under Bush) some co-workers were down in SanDiego for one of our conferences, they took a day trip to Mexico, on the way back in Alan stops and shots a photo of the border. HE was detained for hours - he is of Chinese descent - the others (white) were told to get lost.

  15. #30
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    My high school teacher (of German ancestry) grew up in LA and was a teen when this happened. He said it was surreal when he realized a lot of the Japanese-American friends/classmates in his classes were gone overnight. He also remembered some neighbors bought houses/stores from departing Japanese-Americans for cheap and returned them to them when they returned from the internment.

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