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Thread: South Korea has its own Missile system, that works and can hit anwhere in North Korea

  1. #31
    You buy me drinkie [RNZE]Sapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISNJH View Post
    Danger I see is that the North hardliners may think an another small attack would not endanger them and that the South will not respond in greater force in an effort to ensure peace and they can get away with another small attack to try and increase there standing after the failed rocket launch.
    That is the danger. And again, we've done this before in another thread, South Korea is not gonna roll the North over another 30 dead sailors. Sad but true. They may attack and wipe out say 3000 Nork peons. But that is well within the numbers the Norks can absorb. Not only that, it will only strengthen the regime within North Korean. In fact, they might be counting on it.

    So South Korea is really in a damned if you do, damned if you don't situation. Which is kinda where they're at for the last few decades.

    Again, I feel for the Koreans. Brothers fighting brothers over their common enemy's geopolitics. There's no easy way out of a civil war.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by [RNZE]Sapper View Post
    That is the danger. And again, we've done this before in another thread, South Korea is not gonna roll the North over another 30 dead sailors. Sad but true. They may attack and wipe out say 3000 Nork peons. But that is well within the numbers the Norks can absorb. Not only that, it will only strengthen the regime within North Korean. In fact, they might be counting on it.

    So South Korea is really in a damned if you do, damned if you don't situation. Which is kinda where they're at for the last few decades.

    Again, I feel for the Koreans. Brothers fighting brothers over their common enemy's geopolitics. There's no easy way out of a civil war.
    You forget South Korean nationalism is against the concept of shedding the blood of your kin. Where as in China they see Taiwan as people of their civilization and culture they have no qualms on the thought of shedding "Chinese" blood. South Koreans resolutely view North Koreans as their kin regardless of being an adversary or not.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by bravosixniner View Post
    You forget South Korean nationalism is against the concept of shedding the blood of your kin. Where as in China they see Taiwan as people of their civilization and culture they have no qualms on the thought of shedding "Chinese" blood. South Koreans resolutely view North Koreans as their kin regardless of being an adversary or not.
    I'll have what your smoking....

    have you heard of the term "Chinese don't fight Chinese"?

    if you swap China and Taiwan...then your statement might make more sense.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mokokko View Post
    Does Southern Korean has nukes or nuke projects like Northern Korean ?
    we had nuke project in late 70's...

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by bravosixniner View Post
    You forget South Korean nationalism is against the concept of shedding the blood of your kin. Where as in China they see Taiwan as people of their civilization and culture they have no qualms on the thought of shedding "Chinese" blood. South Koreans resolutely view North Koreans as their kin regardless of being an adversary or not.
    -While such sentiments play some part in thinking, in my view only a small part, and nowhere near the dominant part that you imply. I currently reside in South Korea, and have visited China more times than I can count, and so from personal experience I believe that your theory is as substantial as the last wisps of smoke from a bong. Anti-North Korean sentiment always rises sharply (as one would expect) whenever North Korean "incidents" causes casualties/deaths. This is just plain common sense. Whether in Korea or any other country, if my neighbor kills my wife or child, I'm going to want payback, and it won't matter a whit whether the killer is an eighth cousin once removed.

    South Koreans choose restraint not because the North Koreans are Korean, but because they believe that there are still, at this time, better solutions to the problem than the destruction and casualties (on both sides) that a full-scale war entails.

    -On the other hand, I've never met an ordinary Han Chinese who didn't believe that they were ethnically distinct. Nationalism and bigotry in China is very much of the Old World variety. In my view, the vast majority of Chinese feel an emotional attachment to the Taiwan issue exactly because they believe the island is Han Chinese, and has been for the last four hundred years (98% of the population self-identifies as originating from the large-scale migrations from the Han mainland). If this were not the case, then China really wouldn't have a leg to stand on with regard to Taiwan, given the fact that, in the last century, all other empires of the world have given up territories not inhabited by their ethnic peoples.

    -Feelings of "brotherhood" did not prevent the North Koreans (just as ethnically Korean as the South) from causing possibly over one million deaths (some credible estimates place the South Korean death toll of civilians plus military at 2 million) of fellow Koreans in the Korean War. Nor did it prevent the 600,000 South Korean troops involved (the single largest contingent of combatants on the Southern side, and twice the size of American forces) from responding in this bloody conflict, once stiffened by allied materiel and organization, against their NK brethren, eventually going deep into the North to do so (before being stopped by the human waves of decidedly non-Korean Chinese "volunteers").

    -This willingness on the part of both sides to inflict slaughter on those of their "blood" would make Koreans no different than any other nation on Earth. This is, actually, the metaphorical lesson of Jacob and Esau. In relative terms, possibly the costliest conflict in European history was the Thirty Years War of the 17th century, which was primarily a fratricidal melee between ethnic Germans, in which up to 30-40% of the populations in these German states died. More Americans died in the Civil War than in all other wars combined. If we view analogous and multiple conflicts in France, Britain, Russia, Italy, India, Japan, Korea even before the Korean War, China (among the "Han" themselves), in wars of unification, re-unification, revolution, etc., a compelling argument can be made that "brother-against-brother" conflicts have, always and everywhere, been among the bloodiest and most vicious in the sorry history of mankind.

    -If it is true that there is a contrast between the current moderation of South Korean response vs. North Korea, in comparison to a lack of qualms on the part of China vs. Taiwan (which I accept for argument sake, although I am somewhat skeptical if it is as black-and-white as you suggest), I am more inclined to ascribe it to the nature of the respective regimes than to some sentiment of blood kinship.

    The democratic nature of South Korea causes restraint in seriously considering offensive wars of opportunity (vs. wars of necessity), and pushes consideration of individual costs vs. national objectives front and center in political decision-making. Authoritarian regimes, by their institutional nature, possess more freedom of action in that regard.

    (I sometimes speculate that there exists a kind of thermodynamic law with regard to freedom of action; that the total increments of freedom in any human system is finite, and that therefore the amount that resides in institutional authority is necessarily and proportionally a decrease in freedom for the Leibnizian "monads" that are individual human actors, in a kind of zero-sum game)
    Last edited by juxtapose; 04-24-2012 at 11:59 AM. Reason: spelling

  6. #36
    Senior Member Kadrun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mokokko View Post
    Does Southern Korean has nukes or nuke projects like Northern Korean ?
    The ROK ran nuclear program during 1970s, but the program was terminated after the deal between the US and the ROK. Afterward, some scientists who were involved in the program "disappeared" or killed. Some accuses the CIA for assassinating several scientists, but both governments remain silence and no one has proof to prove.

    Besides nuke, I bet the ROK still stores huge amount of BC weapons although it says BC weapons were eliminated completely. (hey ROK has ballistic missile with 500 km range operational although its limit is 300 km, so you don't know what the ROK is hiding)

  7. #37

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    There are some news agencies in the region saying that North has completed preparations and may conduct a nuclear test tomorrow before or following their military parade in the capital.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kadrun View Post
    The ROK ran nuclear program during 1970s, but the program was terminated after the deal between the US and the ROK. Afterward, some scientists who were involved in the program "disappeared" or killed. Some accuses the CIA for assassinating several scientists, but both governments remain silence and no one has proof to prove.

    Besides nuke, I bet the ROK still stores huge amount of BC weapons although it says BC weapons were eliminated completely. (hey ROK has ballistic missile with 500 km range operational although its limit is 300 km, so you don't know what the ROK is hiding)
    I would like to hear the whole story.
    My favorite anecdote I've heard about SK's nuclear weapon program is how Park boast that he will parade the bomb on 1981 armed forces day and then announce his resignation.

    Here is the link that discuss fallout from SK nuclear weapon program: http://www.japanfocus.org/-Scott-Bruce/3630

  9. #39

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    Thanks Its Schoolchildren For Building Such Nice MLR Tank launchers
    North Korea's official propaganda outlet, the Korean Central News Agency, recently declared the state's appreciation for all those young school kids who "helped" manufacture rocket-shooting tanks for the People's Army. The announcement, which coincided with a military parade in the country's second-largest city to show off the vehicles, also thanked the "Democratic Women's Union":
    http://www.theatlantic.com/internati...NfIqfk.twitter

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