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Thread: Emergency Preparedness.

  1. #16
    Senior Member junglejim's Avatar
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    Advantage of living in a country that gets hit with 20 typhoons a year, all buildings have generators. Having said that, I can not emphasize this enough a 4x4 with a tank full of gas is almost always a necessity in times of disasters. Canned goods and water is also vital.

    I live in the middle of a 40 story building, so if an earthquake hits, im pretty much screwed, though they say the buildings in Manila have been designed with earthquakes in mind... so maybe a rope that can carry my weight to get doen from 26 stories if that is needed.

  2. #17
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    jim good point..i try to never let my 4wd get below half a tank, just in case

  3. #18
    Senior Member junglejim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coattail Rider View Post
    jim good point..i try to never let my 4wd get below half a tank, just in case
    A guy here is a volunteer rescue, that is all his gear:



    Wish I was that prepared, but I think he now does it as a business designing vehicles for rescue.

  4. #19
    Unpopular Nonentertaining Member Abolith's Avatar
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    I have a Bug out bag ready with all the stuff I'd normally take camping in the High Serrias + a few MRE's, camelback insert and my rifle and ammo. that's really all I'd need to survive through summer/spring up here plenty to hunt if needed... Winter would be a good bit harder, but if that were the case I'd have to simply make some hard choices and do my best to survive.

  5. #20

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    We at home have always tried to have some emergency stuff, but itīs only being during recent years that we made it more `professionalī:

    We always keep a first-aid kit at home.
    Every night we fill a couple of huge bottles with drinkable water, enough for some adults to spend 1 or 2 days
    Canned food and dried stuff are a must-have in our kitchen
    We also have candles, oil lamps (+ an oil reserve). Needless to mention we have several flashlights all over the place (located in corners where I can reach them)
    I have a very good set of tools to do wathever emergency repair I may need at home. Iīm pretty handy with them
    We have guns at home for protection, and I personally make sure everybody at home knows where they are, how to use them + safety rules.
    Our front door was reinforced
    In case we need to leave the place, I have a tent, an emergency heater + oil for it, some outdoor tools (folding shovel, hatchet)
    I have a gas reserve with 10 liters of gas (thatīs 1/4 gas tank of my car, enough to go to and return from the hills). I never let my tank to be less than 50%
    Always with me: a multitool or a pocket knife
    I also bought an extra fire extinghisher
    We keep our important paperwork in one single bag
    This is important: we make sure everybody knows what to do / what to take if we need to leave home.


    I donīt share the idea of living in a basement waiting for doomsday, but I refuse the attitude of not making plans for emergency.

  6. #21
    Senior Member custodes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ought Six View Post
    I live in an earthquake and volcano zone, so I am ready for a month without normal services or government assistance. I could go a lot longer, if necessary.

    One thing most people do not realize is stored water is critical. In a severe earthquake, wells become useless as the shaking fills them with mud. With major volcanic eruptions, the ash will contaminate all surface water in the area, including streams, rivers, lakes and ponds. The earthquakes that always accompany such eruptions will also mud up your well. In an area like mine, just having purification equipment and/or a well is not enough.
    We have lots of flooding around here. Even sewer system, piped in, tap water can go bad for a time in some flood emergencies. So it is either filter,boil and chlorine pills or keep emergency supplies. I have some boxed water.

  7. #22
    Senior Member HK in AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by themacedonian View Post
    Yes. That is right. I know what I can do without but I have seen my wife going psycho over lack of cheese at one given moment.
    LOL. Well if all else fails, she is expendable!

  8. #23
    Milo Drinker of Death Flagg's Avatar
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    We've gone through a pair of pretty bad local earthquakes in the past two years.

    The second quake disrupted power/water/sewage for an extended period.

    As we live on the beach, we had a basic plan we put to the test with a couple of tsunami false alarms.

    Some basic suggestions:

    *Have a plan to leave your home quickly(say 5 minutes)

    For us this includes co-locating my military kit, our camping kit, rations, water, coms, sufficient all weather clothing and footwear, and critical essential documents/valuables.......basically everything we NEED for two weeks, and a few morale boosting WANTS.

    Map recce and route recce for where you're going and the options for getting there.

    Inventory book and rotation plan for anything with a shelf life

    Coms plan and marry up plan if family separated

    *Have a plan to leave your home with a bit more time(say 60 minutes)

    Same as above plus:

    Everything we NEED, and the WANTS we can carry by vehicle......basically everything you would bring within reason if you were never returning to the house

    *Have a plan to stay in your home for an extended period without services

    Sufficient long storage food for 6+ months
    Sufficient water storage and filtration for 6 months(with somewhat strict water rationing)
    Sufficient public health, lighting, cooking, communication, and morale gear for high end indoor camping
    Sufficient passive home security, access control, deterrence, and local community relationships complemented by more active means of security

    Some things to have on hand or do BEFORE an emergency:

    Katadyn water filter......or two....or three

    Fill up your vehicles when half empty NOT fully empty....ensure your vehicle is well maintained....carry a vehicle self-recovery kit, and backpack with 48 hours of food/water/med kit/essentials

    Ability to power/recharge mobile phones, HF/VHF/UHF coms, tablet/notebook, batteries, lights....Gennies are great, but they really burn through diesel and especially petrol

    Single burner camp stove can run forever on a single big bottle of propane....a lot longer than an oversized BBQ

    Porta****er and heaps of bogroll

    Large potable water storage containers....some half filled water containers can be placed in a well insulated deep freezer to reduce energy consumption as well as help a freezer stay frozen longer in a power outage...and provide supply of ice/water

    Building a supply of long shelf life food can actually pay for itself.....when long shelf life stuff you like goes on loss-leader "super sale"...buy it all.

    LED click lights...better to burn through a couple of rechargeable AA LED click light batteries than to burn gennie fuel.

    If you have your own water supply, solar water heating...or for everyone else a solar camp shower.

    If you require any prescription meds, get your Doc to write out bigger scripts

    If you have any medical training/experience, get your Doc to write out some emergency scripts(expeditionary stuff) if you know what you're doing, but non prescription stuff like Loperimide(anti diahrea) and rehydration salts.

    If you have young kids......load up on wide and deep on the shelves at home when it comes to diapers and baby formula powder

    No running water requires a large supply of alcohol based hand sanitizer

    Think damage control on a submarine, but with your house......tarps, tools, materials to make your home or others weather tight

    Like minded friends/family

    Most people are good but lazy, only a few are evil.
    Most people are sheep, only a few are leaders
    Most people will share, sharing/helping isn't communism...it's a sign of a healthy community..they're really not after your Lucky Charms

    Check your insurance policy for storage of flammables(gas for genset)

    Stock up on good liquer and cigars. That alone will get you 60%+ of the local community vote for warlord.

  9. #24
    Keeping it in the family pascalywood's Avatar
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    I started prepping recently. Everytime I go to the grocery store I get water and canned food. We have a rechargable AM/FM radio, guns and ammo, medical supplies and tools. Im teaching the gf how to use the 870 and the sks next week. Disposable plates, glasses and ustensils are next on my list, you save water by not having to wash the dishes. Got a wood stove with plenty of wood too.

    The problem I have is that we live in a bigenerational house with my in-law parents and their son. My father in law has a heart condition that requires coumadin, a medication that makes the blood less thick. If he falls, it will create an internal bleeding that requires a trip to the hospital. If he runs out of meds, his blood will thicken and he might have a stroke.

    By the way I found this cool site on prepping, its a 52 weeks plan http://readynutrition.com/resources/...ater_06042011/

  10. #25
    A little plastered Arfah's Avatar
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    In the event of something occurring that you've had minimum notice with.

    1: Don't panic

    2: Remain calm

    3: Assert your priorities

    4: Make a plan and adapt it as necessary.

    5: Maintain a positive mental attitude

  11. #26
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    Well known site, very nice info for survival in general:

    http://www.equipped.org/blog/?p=43


    [SIZE=2]Lessons Learned from the Kim Family[/SIZE]


    The most fundamental missed opportunity was a lack of preparation for an unexpected emergency, which on any road trip includes being stranded.

  12. #27
    Member Solomin's Avatar
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    Some other important things to consider.

    Sanitation - Have a shovel, even if you live in the suburbs, have a shovel. If the water stops working you are going to have to bury your bodily waste. Also have hand sanitizer products and other disinfecting products such as rubbing alcohol.

    Bleach - 8 drops of bleach will purify 1 gallon of water. (http://www.prepareandsurvive.info/do...andStorage.pdf)

  13. #28
    Milo Drinker of Death Flagg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pascalywood View Post
    My father in law has a heart condition that requires coumadin, a medication that makes the blood less thick. If he falls, it will create an internal bleeding that requires a trip to the hospital. If he runs out of meds, his blood will thicken and he might have a stroke.

    [/URL]
    Talk to him about stocking up on his Coumadin/Warfarin. It has a pretty decent length shelf life, as do MOST prescription pharmaceuticals...and MOST retain efficacy FAR longer than the specified shelf life.

    It's my understanding that the most important pharmaceutical class to be mindful of expiration dates is antibiotics.

    But don't listen to me, seek professional advise as I'm just a person on the interweb.

  14. #29
    Milo Drinker of Death Flagg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by junglejim View Post
    Advantage of living in a country that gets hit with 20 typhoons a year, all buildings have generators. Having said that, I can not emphasize this enough a 4x4 with a tank full of gas is almost always a necessity in times of disasters. Canned goods and water is also vital.

    I live in the middle of a 40 story building, so if an earthquake hits, im pretty much screwed, though they say the buildings in Manila have been designed with earthquakes in mind... so maybe a rope that can carry my weight to get doen from 26 stories if that is needed.
    One of my baggies(soldiers) who works as a lawyer on civvie street sorted out an improvised rope so his office could get down from the 4th or 5th floor I believe it was.

    26 in one hit would be expensive. Does the exterior of the building and windows lend themselves to making it easier to go down the outside in stages breaking windows with a hooligan bar and recovering your rope?

    Stairwells can collapse and act like dominos(have some Army fire fighter friends who learned all about that for real), but if not completely logjammed can be a risk weighed option to descend IF you've got some rope/tools/basic skills.

  15. #30
    Senior Member junglejim's Avatar
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    It has balconies and glass windows that i could breakdow, though it eould be hard to recover the rope. I am thinking of the worst case where some areas have collapsed and just using the rope tobget from one floor to the other and in stages.

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