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Thread: Emergency Preparedness.

  1. #46
    Senior Member Rosbach's Avatar
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    It all starts by preparing for the basics


  2. #47
    Senior Member skyeye's Avatar
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    Make a bug out plan AND a bug in plan.

    Make plans for your family to meet up without communications if in separate locations when TSHTF.

    Figure on putting in a lot of time on planning and preparations. Involve all members of family in planning.

    Practice your plans with all those in your family/group.

    Don't forget your pets/livestock.

  3. #48
    Senior Member HK in AK's Avatar
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    This is the type of unit that I am building.....it is a little bit different because the heat will be provided by wood or coal.



    Drive will turn a pulley that is hooked up to generator.

  4. #49
    Keeping it in the family pascalywood's Avatar
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    Lots of good advices in this thread, I recommend to make it sticky.
    Last edited by pascalywood; 12-23-2012 at 07:38 AM. Reason: still asleep

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flagg View Post
    1 month organic power is a LOT........with the events we had we lost mobile communication base stations far faster than that.......some lasted only a few hours on battery backup combined with a spike in traffic.
    Yeah,same here the batteries last over 6 hrs if generator fails(the base station has supply voltage of 48V).
    Well in some of the remote areas of my country,in base stations we have fuel tanks "burried" in the ground with over 8.000 L of diesel and generators are equipped with pumps that automaticaly transfer fuel from the "big" tank to the generator tank.

  6. #51

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    go a little green or blue, or whatever it is called in your area, I do not make jokes.

    Thermal solar modules.
    A few of them on the roof, more than enough for hot water and heat ..

    (In Spain used Vavuum thermal solar tubes, generate enough heat so that the pools are heated by the excess heat)

    for storing the generated heat during the day. something like this:

    http://www.ivt-rohr.de/en/solar-systems/#c409

    It is designed to fit through existing doors, and easy to move with 2 people and easy to connect


    Electric solar modules with something like this:

    http://www.sma.de/produkte/backup-systeme.html

    plus a pair of car or truck batteries, and you're golden.


    LED light balls.
    A normal Lightbulb consumed 45 to 100 W. a LED 15 to 30 W.

    that's a big difference when you have to generate your electrical energy with a generator that needs fuel.


    OK that's expensive, and it is useless if you have no source of water.
    but if you're already become the locale warlord because you bought with fire water and cigars 60% of people. Have you then a proper HQ.

  7. #52
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    Guys... just asking for an advice.

    I think my home is ready to be "bunkered" it. My problem now is for an escape plan meaning I need a bug-out bag. Can anyone give a proper and detailed advice for this?

    I have a friend who said any backpack won't do cuz I might be running and the backpack would just "jiggle" and might come loose. He insisted it should be those hiking/camping
    ones with lots of straps. Is this true? If so, what kind of bag is recommended?

    Lastly, what should be inside my bag?

  8. #53
    Milo Drinker of Death Flagg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goodbert View Post
    go a little green or blue, or whatever it is called in your area, I do not make jokes.

    Thermal solar modules.
    A few of them on the roof, more than enough for hot water and heat ..

    (In Spain used Vavuum thermal solar tubes, generate enough heat so that the pools are heated by the excess heat)

    for storing the generated heat during the day. something like this:

    http://www.ivt-rohr.de/en/solar-systems/#c409

    It is designed to fit through existing doors, and easy to move with 2 people and easy to connect


    Electric solar modules with something like this:

    http://www.sma.de/produkte/backup-systeme.html

    plus a pair of car or truck batteries, and you're golden.


    LED light balls.
    A normal Lightbulb consumed 45 to 100 W. a LED 15 to 30 W.

    that's a big difference when you have to generate your electrical energy with a generator that needs fuel.


    OK that's expensive, and it is useless if you have no source of water.
    but if you're already become the locale warlord because you bought with fire water and cigars 60% of people. Have you then a proper HQ.
    Batteries are worth elaborating on a bit. Lots of different types of batteries, people need to make sure they try and get the batteries that best suit home solar/energy storage. 6V golf cart batteries wired in pairs/series can work well. Just using car batteries(designed to hold a small charge over a long period) isn't optimal. Batteries designed for deep discharge and fast recharge are better suited for home solar/energy storage. So while cheap car batteries will work, golf cart type deep discharge batteries will work better, all things being equal.

    Also, I've got a little experience with LEDs. They are now making 1W, 3W, 5W LEDs that are quite suitable for indoor lighting use. If you take some time to design/plan your lighting/energy requirements you may find using some lower draw items makes for overall lower costs and gear(PV panels, batteries, invertor, gennie, petrol/diesel) supporting it.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by comet View Post
    Guys... just asking for an advice.

    I think my home is ready to be "bunkered" it. My problem now is for an escape plan meaning I need a bug-out bag. Can anyone give a proper and detailed advice for this?

    I have a friend who said any backpack won't do cuz I might be running and the backpack would just "jiggle" and might come loose. He insisted it should be those hiking/camping
    ones with lots of straps. Is this true? If so, what kind of bag is recommended?

    Lastly, what should be inside my bag?
    Bunkered up against what, a tornado? Bug-out… Exactly what are you going to be bugging out of/from? Do you live in a country on the edge of civil war? Are you bugging out of Syria, maybe out of the war torn continent of Africa? It sounds like you live in a fragile place? What is your “realistic” threat?

  10. #55
    Senior Member HK in AK's Avatar
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    For a bug out bag, I would recommend a waterproof backpack. I use a Sealline 115L. They store a lot of gear and are waterproof.....never know with floods and stuff.

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by HK in AK View Post
    For a bug out bag, I would recommend a waterproof backpack. I use a Sealline 115L. They store a lot of gear and are waterproof.....never know with floods and stuff.
    If you are expecting water. Otherwise you could shave of some weight by going with simple non waterproof stuff. It all depends on what you are preparing for. And why such a large a pack. Are you “bugging out” of country or just over to the nearest town? I think you win more by specifying what you see as the realistic need. Staying out in the woods or getting to a specific location can mean a lot of different needs in your specific setup.

  12. #57
    Senior Member HK in AK's Avatar
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    Moose....exactly.......I am live around a lot of water and rain country....hence my need for waterproof...

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose View Post
    Bunkered up against what, a tornado? Bug-out… Exactly what are you going to be bugging out of/from? Do you live in a country on the edge of civil war? Are you bugging out of Syria, maybe out of the war torn continent of Africa? It sounds like you live in a fragile place? What is your “realistic” threat?
    Bug-out :

    I need to leave my place in a hurry and can survive at least 3-5 days with what I have.

    Reasons for this could be flood, tsunami ( Asia ), forced evacuation from authorities, etc. I'm not in a war-torn country so I don't think I need assault rifles to protect myself BUT you never
    know what happens especially to human beings confronted with dire scenarios. My fellow "evacuees" could turn out psychos and do crazy ish.

  14. #59
    Μολὼν λαβέ Hollis's Avatar
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    [*******#ff0000]Let's keep bug out to natural disasters.

    Preparedness to natural disasters too.
    [/COLOR]

  15. #60
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    ^^ alright understood. I was just thinking ahead once the calamity has passed and I had to survive the aftermath

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