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Thread: Symbol of Argentina's Decaying Navy Sinks in Port

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    Senior Member Jeancarl's Avatar
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    Default Symbol of Argentina's Decaying Navy Sinks in Port

    [SIZE=2]Symbol of Argentina's Decaying Navy Sinks in Port[/SIZE]

    Argentina's defense chief expressed shame Wednesday after a Navy destroyer sank at its moorings, putting on display the declining fortunes of a once-proud fleet.
    The ARA Trinidad led Argentina's 1982 sea war against Britain, but has long been mothballed and used for spare parts to sustain what's left of Argentina's Navy.


    A Navy statement said that a pipe burst, flooding the ship below decks. Defense Minister Arturo Puricelli denied that cuts to the fleet's maintenance budget were to blame. He said negligence or "sabotage" were possible and demanded a complete investigation.
    "When the president asks me, I'll be ashamed, frankly, to tell her that a boat sank while tied to the dock," Puricelli told Radio 10. "There has to be a well-founded reason for this."


    Opposition congressmen blamed a decade of disinvestment in Argentina's military, and said the country is ill-equipped to defend its seas.
    "That a boat sinks in port due to a lack of maintenance reveals the deterioration and abandonment of our fleet, vital to the defense of a sovereignty that our president never loses an opportunity to proclaim to the world, but which we are very far from being able to defend," Congressman Gustavo Ferrari said.


    Ferrari presented a study last year concluding that Argentina's army, air force, coast guard and navy were all badly underfunded.
    Several Navy ships have had trouble operating: the warship Espora was stuck in South Africa last year for lengthy repairs, and breakdowns kept the destroyer Argentina from completing a mission in Brazil. The icebreaker Almirante Irizar is still in repairs after a 2007 fire.
    Puricelli acknowledged the delays, but said nearly $100 million has been spent on repairs.


    Meanwhile, Argentina's 3,100-mile (4,989-kilometer) coastline is being protected by a fleet that has been reduced to three destroyers, two other warships, several patrol boats, two scientific vessels, an icebreaker and the Libertad, the tall ship used to train cadets that was detained for months in Africa last year as collateral for unpaid debts.


    Congressman Julio Martinez said Wednesday that of a total of 70 navy ships, only 16 are in sailing condition, and even then only barely. He said increases in defense spending have gone to salaries, leaving little or nothing for maintenance or investment in hardware.
    "It's hugely hypocritical to talk of sabotage when for 10 years the ship has been abandoned," Martinez told Argentina's Todo Noticias channel.


    The Trinidad was mothballed only a few years after leading the ultimately unsuccessful occupation of the Falklands, which Argentines claim as the Islas Malvinas. Martinez said he, like most Argentines, has no desire to wage another war, "but if the country lacks defenses, and the British know that, they won't ever negotiate a peaceful resolution."


    http://abcnews.go.com/International/...-port-18294579

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    Senior Member ~UNiOnJaCk~'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeancarl View Post
    , "but if the country lacks defenses, and the British know that, they won't ever negotiate a peaceful resolution."
    What is to negotiate pray tell?

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    Senior Member bababooey's Avatar
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    Sell it for scrap and make a few bucks. As far as I can see, no one is interested in attacking Argentina. The military is just a drain on their resources. Besides, their military couldn't do much against Brazil or Chile if they decided to invade. Their limited funds so go to keeping the industrial base working by developing homegrown solutions that could be exported to emerging third world countries. The Arg's need to look at Costa Rica as a model for future defense needs and forget the "Malvinas". They blew their chance in the 80's and England won't let that happen again. Arg should concentrate on getting European pensioners to emigrate and spend their money.

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    "sabotage"
    Jesus, seriously......sabotaging a laid up warship. What a clown.

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    L O L A JCR's Avatar
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    Its never good when the Holy Trinity capsizes

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    Member Felipe S Xicotencatl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bababooey View Post
    Sell it for scrap and make a few bucks. As far as I can see, no one is interested in attacking Argentina. The military is just a drain on their resources. Besides, their military couldn't do much against Brazil or Chile if they decided to invade. Their limited funds so go to keeping the industrial base working by developing homegrown solutions that could be exported to emerging third world countries. The Arg's need to look at Costa Rica as a model for future defense needs and forget the "Malvinas". They blew their chance in the 80's and England won't let that happen again. Arg should concentrate on getting European pensioners to emigrate and spend their money.
    I disagree. Every country has a legitimate right to defend itself. Argentina has every right to have a decent navy and armed forces in general. If it went the way of Costa Rica and it needed to defend itself some day, who's it going to rely on to do so? The U.N.? It's neighbors? The U.S.?
    It is a damm shame and very embarrasing that that destroyer sank. It could quite possibly have been sabotage, but not by any enemy, it could have been self inflicted to bring attention to the conditions of the navy and military in general in Argentina, a way of trying to get a budget increase. The good thing is that it sank in port and not out at sea.

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    Senior Member Mackie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by muttbutt View Post
    Jesus, seriously......sabotaging a laid up warship. What a clown.
    Probably a British tourist threw a stone.

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    It hasn't been at sea for a long time, it has been retired and harbour bound for decades if memory serves.

    We have some 42's for sale if Argentina wants to replace it.

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    smartypants clean's Avatar
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    If it's any consolation, Sweden's most famous navy ship sunk a mile off shore on it's maiden voyage.

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    L O L A JCR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clean View Post
    If it's any consolation, Sweden's most famous navy ship sunk a mile off shore on it's maiden voyage.
    I somehow doubt that anyone will raise the ARA Santissima Trinidad in the year 2360 and put her in a museum

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    Member Felipe S Xicotencatl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCR View Post
    I somehow doubt that anyone will raise the ARA Santissima Trinidad in the year 2360 and put her in a museum
    Why not? She's got some history behind her.

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    It is not really the first or last time there will be a mishap with a ship thats been at port for that long, so I wouldn't put anything into that really.

    But I didn't know that the state of the Argentinian Navy was as poor as stated in the rest of the article, puts all the aggressive retoric on the Falklands in a really strange light, as obviously Argentina have zero percent chance of taking the Falklands by force as it stands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Felipe S Xicotencatl View Post
    Why not? She's got some history behind her.
    Vasa was salvaged centuries later because a. its wooden structure was preserved by the polluted lifeless water b. its precise location was lost soon after its sunk. Trinidad has no chance become such a legend.

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    My understanding is that the Air force is not much better off....

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