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Thread: Map proves Portuguese discovered Australia: new book

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    Member siberian tiger's Avatar
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    Default Map proves Portuguese discovered Australia: new book

    (*******) - A 16th century maritime map in a Los Angeles library vault proves that Portuguese adventurers, not British or Dutch, were the first Europeans to discover Australia, says a new book which details the secret discovery of Australia.

    http://www.*******.com/article/2007/...D3449720070321

    replace ****** with r e u t e r s
    Last edited by siberian tiger; 03-25-2013 at 08:22 PM.

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    Peacemaker Zorro C9's Avatar
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    Did they do anything about it? No. Nice footnote.

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    Bush Lawyer, that's me! TheKiwi's Avatar
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    Probably because they were running the worlds second biggest (at the time) empire. More vast tracks of empty (goldless) lands were not exactly high up the list of priorities....

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    Senior Member PATTO's Avatar
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    Thats old news. We've been taught the Portuguese and the Dutch discovered Australia before the English for the last 30 years. Then again my mothers side were here for the last 40,000 years.

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    Member siberian tiger's Avatar
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    The portuguese empire in the 1500s was not a normal land empire like Mongol or Roman... it is said it was a sea traiding empire, it was several trading posts in China and India, with several forts spread around Africa (Suez canal didnīt exist yet) to support the several fleets that come and go from China/India around Africa to Portugal.

    The portuguese couldn`t take Australia, they didn`t have the manpower to control and colonise a place so big, and that was not the objective, the objective back then was discover new sea routes to places to trade with, like spices from India, silk from China, things like that.

    And to find gold yes like the kiwi said, Brasil, and some African places had gold, probably australia didn`t had, or it was dificult to find and explore.

    This notice is to correct history, like the vikings were the first europeans to reach America, they didn`t do anything also lolol.
    Last edited by siberian tiger; 03-25-2013 at 08:31 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PATTO View Post
    Thats old news. We've been taught the Portuguese and the Dutch discovered Australia before the English for the last 30 years. Then again my mothers side were here for the last 40,000 years.
    It was much easier to discover Australia, America, etc 40,000 years ago because the sea levels were lower and you could just walk there. But once the glaciers melted the old pre-history routes were literally erased.

    Quote Originally Posted by siberian tiger View Post
    And to find gold yes like the kiwi said, Brasil, and some African places had gold, probably australia didn`t had, or it was dificult to find and explore.
    The Portuguese never found gold they found locals who were mining it and traded for it. If they had sailed around Australia and stopped here and there to talk to the locals they wouldn’t have had any access to Australian precious metals because there was no local mining. The Australian Aborigines wouldn’t have been able to offer much of value to the Portuguese so they would have left and never returned.

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    Senior Member PATTO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asgnr View Post
    It was much easier to discover Australia, America, etc 40,000 years ago because the sea levels were lower and you could just walk there. But once the glaciers melted the old pre-history routes were literally erased.



    The Portuguese never found gold they found locals who were mining it and traded for it. If they had sailed around Australia and stopped here and there to talk to the locals they wouldn’t have had any access to Australian precious metals because there was no local mining. The Australian Aborigines wouldn’t have been able to offer much of value to the Portuguese so they would have left and never returned.
    The dutch and porugese landed in the most desolate places mainly in the west which caused them to report unfavourably on the land, when they saw the aborigines they considered them not even worthy to use as slaves. One captain reported thathe didn't think they would even carry as much as the cabin boy. Lucky for the locals during the time of the slave trade. The big mystery for us is did the portugese discover the eastern side of australia. There are rumours of a ship wreck but noone has found it. The maps Cook used had the the western northern and some southern parts mapped(taken from the existing dutch and portugese charts).
    Van dieman reported giants must exist when he mistook climbing holes in the trees in tasmainia.

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    Senior Member IraGlacialis's Avatar
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    Considering the proximity to Indonesia, I'm more surprised that this was not confirmed earlier.

    I'm also not surprised about the taking-one-look-and-turning-around course of action they took.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PATTO View Post
    The dutch and porugese landed in the most desolate places mainly in the west which caused them to report unfavourably on the land.
    The map referenced to in the Re#ters article shows the Portuguese sailed down the east coast of Australia around to Kangaroo Island and then back home via New Zealand. They also spent some time in Botany Bay because they completely mapped all the inlets.

    But even the east coast of Australia doesn’t offer much from a sailing ship’s perspective. Much of the cost was not appetizing before improvement (sand forests, swamp and muddy river outflows) or inaccessible. If you missed Port Jackson like just about everyone seemed to do except Capt. Phillip you wouldn’t think highly of it. Since the locals were still hunter-gatherers with plenty of hard wood so alleviating any need for metal working and there were no rich local animals (furs and horns) or any coastal plants of value (the very rich timbers were inland in the mountain ranges amongst the sub-tropical rainforests) there was nothing worth selling onwards.

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    Senior Member Elliott70's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PATTO View Post
    The dutch and porugese landed in the most desolate places mainly in the west which caused them to report unfavourably on the land, when they saw the aborigines they considered them not even worthy to use as slaves. One captain reported thathe didn't think they would even carry as much as the cabin boy. Lucky for the locals during the time of the slave trade. .
    Lucky for the locals they didn't land in the Pilbara. According to a local history book 'Yeera-Muk-A-Doo' (or Iramugadoo) the first settlers to the Pilbara were amazed by the size and large build of the local indigenous (the Ngaluma and Yindabarndi people) and typically, thought they would make excellent workers.

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    Member 2/1kiwi's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=asgnr;6637329]The map referenced to in the Re#ters article shows the Portuguese sailed down the east coast of Australia around to Kangaroo Island and then back home via New Zealand. They also spent some time in Botany Bay because they completely mapped all the inlets.

    Theres an old story about Some Maori who were found cooking using a old Portuguese Helmet.

    The Kiwi could probably elaborate a bit more.

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    ANZAC Moderator Ngati Tumatauenga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zorro C9 View Post
    Did they do anything about it? No. Nice footnote.
    Could have been worse. They could have ignored it for 500 + years with little to no development and then withdrawn to leave it wide open for the indo's to invade and subjugate.

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    Senior Member pocoloco's Avatar
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    So now Portugal can claim Australia and the region as theirs, right? Just like China does in the same 'hood.

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    "Wise and Grumpy" Ban Stick Wielder of Death digrar's Avatar
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    Map proves Portuguese discovered Australia: new book. And all we got was an Oporto and Nandos on every corner.

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    Constantly Complaining NanT's Avatar
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    "The Vallard cartographer has put these individual charts together like a jigsaw puzzle. Without clear compass markings its possible to join the southern chart in two different ways. My theory is it had been wrongly joined."

    I have the same theory when doing jigsaw puzzles with the sky as a background, when all else fails, force it in.

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