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Thread: Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV)

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    Member V/E's Avatar
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    Default Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV)

    US marines new vehicle,coming to a beach near you in 2008.


























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    Senior Member ShotOver's Avatar
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    This thing going to have more armour? because the last one has RPG's going throw it like a tin can.

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    The Marine Corps plans to replace the amphibious assault vehicle with 1,013 advanced amphibious assault vehicles for $6.7 billion, including a $456-million increase due to a 2-year procurement delay. With a water speed of 23 to 29 miles per hour, the new vehicle could be launched from amphibious ships 25 miles or more offshore and reach shore far more quickly than the current vehicle. This improved mobility would reduce the risk to Navy ships from missiles, aircraft, boats, and mines. Until the new vehicle is fielded, beginning in 2008, the Marine Corps anticipates spending more to maintain the current vehicle.

    The Marine Corps is developing the AAAV to replace the AAV as its primary combat vehicle for transporting troops on land and from ship to shore. The AAAV must satisfy many operational requirements, which will provide increased capabilities compared to the AAV and improve the ship-to-shore movement, thus allowing the Marine Corps and the Navy to more effectively implement OMFTS.

    The AAAV will be capable of transporting 18 Marines and a crew of three over water at speeds of 29 miles an hour; the design uses a planing hull propelled by two water jets. On land, AAAV will achieve speeds of 45 miles an hour, with cross-country mobility equal to an M1 Abrams tank.

    A smooth transition from water to cross-country movement has always been a difficult and dangerous task for amphibious vehicles. The General Dynamics AAAV design solves this problem by the automatic transfer of power from the high-speed water jets to the vehicle tracks.

    Using the same vehicle design, General Dynamics will also deliver a command and control AAAV variant to the Marines. This mobile command post will provide access to information from satellite and computer-based intelligence sources, as well as from ships, aircraft and other vehicles, while controlling operations at sea or on land.

    The AAAV is the U.S. Marine Corps only acquisition category (ACAT) I acquisition program. The Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) represents the signature mission of the USMC. A truly amphibious vehicle that will replace the USMC's aging current system and provide the capability to maneuver, combat loaded with a Marine rifle squad, at 20-25 knots in the water and maneuver cross country with agility and mobility equal or greater than that of the M1 Main Battle Tank (MBT). The AAAV will virtually revolutionize every facet of USMC combat operations. It is one of the most capable all-around weapon systems in the world. The technology to meet these requirements has been demonstrated, and the plan to procure this system represents the most operationally effective solution for meeting USMC requirements.

    In 1997, nearly the entire Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) team, over one hundred and fifty members, including the prime contractor staff and critical subcontractor personnel, Government and contractor secretaries, engineers, logisticians, computer programmers, and financial managers were given an unprecedented fleet and field exposure to the amphibious operational environment for the sole purpose of improving system design for support, readiness, and durability. Everyone was taken by bus to Norfolk, Virginia and taken on a two day amphibious exercise specifically designed to expose him or her to the systems' operating environment. Everyone rode and most drove amphibious vehicles on land and in the water side-by-side with the Marines of Delta Company, 2nd Amphibious Assault Battalion. The entire group of Government and private industry team members were housed aboard the Amphibious Assault Ships USS Tortuga and USS Oak Hill in troop living spaces for the exercise. The experience resulted in a significant improvement of the team's understanding of operational suitability, support and readiness that is now reflected in improvements in the AAAV design.

    The AAAV will allow the Navy and Marine Corps to seamlessly link maneuver in ships and maneuver ashore enabling Operational Maneuver From The Sea (OMFTS). The AAAV will be the principal means of armored protected land and water mobility and direct fire support for Marine infantry during combat operations. Based on this unique mission profile, the AAAV must leverage state of the art advances in water propulsion, land mobility, lethality and survivability. Lightweight components and structures that are cost and operationally effective and supportable together with a significantly more powerful engine are the primary technical challenges for the AAAV. There are currently 1,322 USMC Assault Amphibious Vehicles (AAV7A1 ) which will be replaced by 1,013 AAAVs beginning late in the first decade of the next century.

    The Marine Corps has a requirement to procure 1,013 AAAVs. Prior to December 1994, the cost to develop and procure AAAVs was estimated at $7.2 billion (then-year dollars). Due to budget constraints, DOD reduced AAAV funding in the FYDP by $189 million in December 1994. As a result, the Marine Corps extended the demonstration and validation phase 22 months and delayed procurement by 2 years, which increased the program's cost by $456 million, to $7.6 billion. As a result, low-rate initial production has been delayed from fiscal year 2003 to 2005; initial operational capability from fiscal year 2006 to 2008; and full operational capability--fielding all required AAAVs to the active assault amphibian battalions and the maritime prepositioning squadrons--from fiscal year 2012 to 2014.

    In July 2001 the US Marine Corps awarded General Dynamics Land Systems, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics, a $712 million contract for the Systems Development and Demonstration phase of the Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) program. Under the cost-reimbursable contract General Dynamics will provide all required material, services, personnel and facilities to complete the design and development of the AAAV, manufacture and test nine new prototypes, refurbish three early development prototypes, support the Marine Corps initial operational test and evaluation, and prepare for the production phase of the program.

    The contract begins the next phase in the development of the world’s most advanced amphibious assault vehicle, which started with award of a $200 million-plus demonstration/validation contract to General Dynamics Land Systems in June 1996. More than 500 General Dynamics employees and contractors, Marines and naval personnel in Woodbridge, Virginia, will do engineering and assembly of the nine new prototype vehicles.

    The Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) was officially renamed the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) sometime in late 2003.

    Two platform variants are under development: the personnel variant (EFV(P)), which will be armed with a 30 mm cannon and a 7.62 mm machinegun and is intended to transport 17 combat-equipped Marines and a three-man crew; and a command and control variant (EFV(C)) which will transport a commander and staff.

    Testing is ongoing, and according to the DOT&E there have been concerns with regards to system reliability.

  4. #4

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    It will terrify the peoples of the world with its pointyness

  5. #5

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    one ugly duck.

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    Senior Member ShakesFIST's Avatar
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    How fast will this thing go? I mean an Abrams only has like what, 1500 hp? This has 2600! Correct me if any of that is wrong, but it sounds like the AAAV will haul ass (without a governer of course )

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    A lot of that hp is for the jetski impersonations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShakesFIST
    How fast will this thing go? I mean an Abrams only has like what, 1500 hp? This has 2600! Correct me if any of that is wrong, but it sounds like the AAAV will haul ass (without a governer of course )
    and the Abrams is heavier too !!

    :P

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    Have they solved the fuel consumption problem ? 2,600 HP is great but I was told my a MC officer that when launched over the horizon, this amtrack uses up over 75% of its fuel reserves just to get to the beach...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sas-magoo

    and the Abrams is heavier too !!
    Swimming is a lot harder than running.

  12. #12

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    I wish I will never see THAT thing on the beach near me.



    57 meter length, 150 tonns of cargo, one hell of fishing boat

    [/list]

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    Cunning Linguist Ratamacue's Avatar
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    Okay, hold on one second.



    Is it just me or does the fuel tank appear to be in a position extremely vulnerable to RPG's?

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    Looks tough to me !! Aslong as it keeps the men inside safe, then its good !

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    Spanish Marine Corps Property MARINO's Avatar
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    It would be a good element to replace Spanish Marines AAVs.It looks well

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