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Thread: 747 cargo crash in Afghanistan

  1. #46
    Senior Member Bauer_CTU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubermensche View Post
    I had a dream of seeing one of those crash last week. Seeing it now is just...unreal. I really wonder what were the last thoughts of the crew.

    May they Rest in Peace.
    I've had a few of such dreams, however seeing it in real life, it's just horrific.

  2. #47
    Member Mavyalex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bauer_CTU View Post
    I've had a few of such dreams, however seeing it in real life, it's just horrific.
    Now I don't want to embark on a place anymore...Geeez...It's such a traumatic experience to see this video...

    For "ubermensche": the last thoughts of the crew were probably for their family..That's what I would think of if I were on an imminent death situation personnally...

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    Senior Member Bauer_CTU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mavyalex View Post
    Now I don't want to embark on a place anymore...Geeez...It's such a traumatic experience to see this video...
    I love aeroplanes, too. I see them as Man's creatures (if it can be described in that way) and seeing such a big bird plummet in such a way...

    I'm not sure, if you or anyone else (and as uber said he did) has seen such a dream, the engines kind of go into a REALLY loud mode, but it's like their last death throes. I'd always awake when I had such dreams (it was when I was younger). Poor crew

  4. #49
    Senior Member EdisonTrent's Avatar
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    RIP

    Do you guys think the plane leveled the wings naturally (don't see how) or that the pilots fought to the end (likely).

    The image of it going straight up... slower and slower until it pitches over. Damn.

  5. #50
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    Horrific. RIP.

    Quote Originally Posted by JJC View Post
    I read an interesting discussion between guys who are pilots and engineers. And the only stuff I was able to pick up from their technical lingo talk is that this did not look like a mechanical failure but a crash based on human factors. "Weight and Balance" was not correctly observed and that the plane went into deep stall.
    Deep stall is only possible if airplanes have a T-tail, like a DC-9. With more altitude they might've been able to survive such stall. At the last moment the nose dropped down like you're supposed to respond to a stall. However, with a 744F you need necessary altitude to correct this, especially with a backward gravity. Flying had not been easy with a load shift, but there are examples of pilots who survived it. Although I've to say that the load shifted at an unfortunate moment.
    Last edited by Surenas; 05-01-2013 at 12:23 PM.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdisonTrent View Post
    RIP

    Do you guys think the plane leveled the wings naturally (don't see how) or that the pilots fought to the end (likely).

    The image of it going straight up... slower and slower until it pitches over. Damn.


    it were the pilots who fought to the end, automation not working in such envelope ( high AOA).

  7. #52
    Senior Member tea drinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdisonTrent View Post
    RIP

    Do you guys think the plane leveled the wings naturally (don't see how) or that the pilots fought to the end (likely).

    The image of it going straight up... slower and slower until it pitches over. Damn.
    It's a strange crash, to see an aircraft so far out of it's comfort zone. I'd say most of the changes were happening according to the aircraft natural recovery, rather than pilot's input, though I'm sure they were struggling with all their strength.
    Hopefully someone who knows such things will have time to comment.







    http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2...h-mourned?lite
    Connerton also described a harrowing flight two years ago from Toledo, Ohio, to an international flight expo in Lakeland, Fla. Connerton said ice had built up on the plane to the point that he could no longer get it to climb.
    "If it wasn't for Jamie's navigation and know-how ... we wouldn't have made it," Connerton said.
    Killed along with Brokaw in the Afghanistan crash were Gary Stockdale, 51, of Romulus, Mich.; pilots Brad Hasler, 34, of Trenton, Mich., and Jeremy Lipka, 37, of Brooklyn, Mich.; first officer Rinku Summan, 32, of Canton, Mich.; loadmaster Michael Sheets, 36, of Ypsilanti, Mich.; and maintenance crewman Timothy Garrett, 51, of Louisville, Ky.
    Building model planes and working on real ones comprised Stockdale's passion, filling the family's basement with models in his youth, jumping into aviation as a career at age 16 — and later working at two Detroit-area airports.
    Stockdale also knew the dangers of flying, his older brother said Tuesday.
    "He always said it was dangerous," said Glenn Stockdale, 55. "He would always say, 'You either will die in a car crash or a ball of flame in a plane.'"

    AP / Courtesy Stockdale Family
    Gary Stockdale, 51, of Romulus, Mich., was killed in a cargo plane crash on Monday.
    Lipka had flown in Iraq as well as Afghanistan and had close calls before, said his stepfather, Dave Buttman.
    "There was risk there all the time. He knew the risks. He volunteered to take the trips," Buttman told the Star Tribune of Minneapolis. "Basically, you're taking your chances flying in there and he was just happy to be one of the pilots to do it."

    The Dubai-bound Boeing 747-400 — operated by National Air Cargo — crashed just after takeoff Monday from Bagram Air Base around 11:20 a.m. local time, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a statement Tuesday.
    The accident site is within the perimeter of Bagram Air Base.
    The Taliban quickly claimed responsibility for downing the plane, but NATO said the claims were false and there was no sign of insurgent activity in the area at the time of the crash.
    The Afghanistan Ministry of Transportation and Commercial Aviation is leading the investigation. The NTSB is investigating the crash alongside the ministry. The team will be composed of three NTSB investigators, as well as representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing, the NTSB said.
    Kaufman said the plane — owned by National Airlines, an Orlando, Fla.-based subsidiary of National Air Cargo — was carrying vehicles and other cargo.
    Elena Garrett, of Jeffersonville, Ind., just across the Ohio River from Louisville, said ex-husband Timothy Garrett would have turned 52 on Saturday. They have two daughters together, ages 11 and 12.


    The guy in the humvee was very cool, no unnecessary commentary in his life.

  8. #53
    Half-Ape MoFo's Avatar
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    That video caught me off guard....absolutey shocking, R.I.P to them all.

  9. #54
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    cant see the liveleak link, saw the vid on youtube:



    just terrible. rest in peace to the crew members..

  10. #55

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    Terrible images indeed. For an amteur like me it simply looks like the plane stop flying at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by JJC View Post
    I read an interesting discussion between guys who are pilots and engineers. And the only stuff I was able to pick up from their technical lingo talk is that this did not look like a mechanical failure but a crash based on human factors. "Weight and Balance" was not correctly observed and that the plane went into deep stall. Pilots didn't have enough altitude to recover. Another detail that was mentioned is because of risk of shoot downs, planes from that airport take off with aggressive, fast nose rise, not a preferred way to take off for cargo planes, which is a risky when they don't gain enough speed and that contributed to some stall. It makes sense if that plane took off at an aggressive angle, the heavy cargo shifted and the rest...
    Thanks for the explanation, makes it pretty clear to understand.

  11. #56
    Senior Member happyslapper's Avatar
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    Good Lord. That's the stuff of nightmares - Rest in Peace to the crew.

  12. #57
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    The inherent danger of aviation. Rest easy brothers.

  13. #58
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    Tragic view. RIP the crew.

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    Real shame, RIP to the crew.

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    Horrible crash
    RIP..

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