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Thread: LM Demonstrates ADAM Ground-Based Laser System in Tests Against Free-Flying Rockets

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    Default LM Demonstrates ADAM Ground-Based Laser System in Tests Against Free-Flying Rockets

    Lockheed Martin Demonstrates ADAM Ground-Based Laser System in Increasingly Complex Tests Against Free-Flying Rockets



    SUNNYVALE, Calif., May 8, 2013 – Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] today announced that it has successfully demonstrated the Area Defense Anti-Munitions (ADAM) system in multiple tests against free-flying Qassam-like rocket targets. The prototype laser system has destroyed eight small-caliber rocket targets in flight at a range of approximately 1.5 kilometers (0.9 miles) in tests conducted in March and April 2013.


    Lockheed Martin is developing the transportable, ground-based ADAM laser system to provide a defense against short-range threats, including improvised rockets such as Qassam rockets, unmanned aerial systems and small boats.

    The tests represent increasingly complex scenarios against representative airborne targets. In 2012, the system successfully destroyed 11 small-caliber rocket targets in simulated flight tethered to a cable at a range of approximately 2 kilometers (1.2 miles). The system also successfully engaged an unmanned aerial system target in flight at a range of approximately 1.5 kilometers (0.9 miles) in 2012.

    “Our test results demonstrate the capabilities of the ADAM system to provide a practical, affordable directed-energy solution to the real-world problem of close-in threats,” said Tory Bruno, president of Strategic and Missile Defense Systems, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company.

    Designed for short-range defense of high-value assets including forward operating bases, the ADAM system’s 10-kilowatt fiber laser is engineered to destroy targets up to 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) away. The system precisely tracks targets in cluttered optical environments and has a tracking range of more than 5 kilometers (3.1 miles). The system is being designed to be flexible enough to operate against rockets as a standalone system and to engage unmanned aerial systems with an external cue. Lockheed Martin based the design on commercial hardware components paired with its laser beam control architecture and software to provide the performance needed for these types of threats without the cost and time required for full custom development. The system is integrated in a container that is mounted on a trailer, making it readily transportable.

    “High-energy lasers complement kinetic energy systems and have unique attributes, including very low cost per engagement, a virtually unlimited ‘magazine’ and minimal collateral damage,” said Doug Graham, Lockheed Martin’s vice president of advanced programs for Strategic and Missile Defense Systems.

    Lockheed Martin has been a pioneer in the development and demonstration of high-energy laser capabilities for more than 30 years and has made key advances in areas such as precision pointing and control, line-of-sight stabilization and adaptive optics.

    Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 118,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation’s net sales for 2012 were $47.2 billion.


    http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/new...7-ss-adam.html

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    That's a younger brother of Navy LaWs : commercial SSLs connected by fibers into 10kW beam. Most likely to be deployed by Army & Air Force to protect overseas FOBs.

    Looks pretty impressive on video in slow motion .

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    Does anybody have information about the wavelength they used.

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    Sigh. Pick another acronym. ADAM is already taken.

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    I would like to know how much its performance is degraded by heavy fog or rain. If it cannot intercept rockets under bad weather conditions then it will never be anything more than an adjunct system to something like Iron Dome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan12 View Post
    Does anybody have information about the wavelength they used.
    Nice try mr. spy, nice try.

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    Sweet! Wonder how it works against aircraft or infantry?

    I'd like my flying car now please!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ought Six View Post
    I would like to know how much its performance is degraded by heavy fog or rain. If it cannot intercept rockets under bad weather conditions then it will never be anything more than an adjunct system to something like Iron Dome.
    Fog , rain and snow are the biggest enemies of laser based systems. Next only to sand storms and Congress' cuts. To make things worse, water molecules absorption lines seat at nearly the same frequencies as practically all hi-energy solid state lasers .

    The good news that Middle Eastern climate is mostly arid , the bad news : Southern Asian climate isn't.

    Still laser beats all known gun/missile based systems in cost per interception , so it likely to pass through thorns to actual deployment .

    Sweet! Wonder how it works against aircraft or infantry?
    It's too underpowered to do a real damage to big aircraft, but could do enough damage to pilots/infantry eyes in 2-3 km to render them completely blind. The only hope is - it probably won't be deployed in such a role , cause eye blinding weapons are strictly prohibited by some half-assed international convention

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