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Thread: Vietnam war colour photos.

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    Default Vietnam war colour photos.



    Sgt. Alex Adams of Morgantown, W. Va. (with the telephone) and Pfc. Ron Hooper of Wichita Falls, Texas (looking through the binoculars) keep lookout from the top of Marble Mountain for any signs of trouble around the Da Nang airbase, November 1st, 1965. The week before the Vietcong had made a number of attacks on the important American base in one of which they destroyed almost 20 helicopters.





    U.S. Marine Congregate in back of tank on a residential street. The tank is firing over an outer wall of the citadel. Hue, February 13th, 1968.




    A critically wounded marine is aided by other marines from "B" Company, September 16th, 1966, two miles South of the de-militarized zone.





    .S. Marine tending to his Machine Gun. He is dug in with the Marines in the trenches surrounding Con Thien, September 25, 1967.





    Con Thien, the U.S. base near the demilitarized zone was a constant target for Communist artillery. It was maze of sandbagged bunkers and waist-deep connecting trenches. October 8, 1967.






    Smoke flare marks landing spot for evacuation helicopter coming in to take out U.S. 1st Cavalrymen wounded in the battle for control of the vital A Shau Valley.




    1st Division troops destroy a rice cache found at a Michelin Rubber Plantation, 1969.






    M-79 Grenade Launcher


    Marine Next to Remains of Viet Cong Soldier

    The charred remains of a Viet Cong soldier lie amid rubble in street where a U.S. Marine stands on the alert for further confrontations with Communist forces. Hue, South Vietnam, February 17, 1968.






    United States Marines injured during operation 'Starlight', near Chu Lai. Batang Peninsula, 1965. Starlite was one of the most successful amphibious operations by the Marines . In August 1965, three Marine Corps battalions overran the 1st Vietcong Regiment and, during the course of a 6 day period, killed over 600 Vietcong soldiers with the loss of 51 Marines and over 200 wounded.





    US Soldiers Participating in Operation Thayer II

    Walking the high-ground that outlines rice paddies, members of the 1/12th, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry go through the paces of a search and destroy maneuver. The U.S. troops were participating in "Operation Thayer II," which took place in North Qui Nhon, South Vietnam.






    th Armored Cavalry Regiment driver on a journey to take position at a Michelin rubber plantation in 1969, wears sunglasses to protect his eyes against the strong sun. The 11th frequently used the ACAV (Armored Cav Assault Vehicle ) as favored by Col. George S. Patton, the regimental commander between 1968 - 1969.





    Marines on a combat-reconnaissance mission crouch down as they move through low foliage in the Demilitarized Zone in February 1968. They have just been attacked by a group of Viet Cong and are waiting for medical assistance and re-inforcements.




    A moved US soldier from the 9th Division at Tan An, Vietnam 1968. He has received three Purple Heart decorations.







    US Soldier After Fighting Atop Hill 875

    The tumult of the battle over, Sgt. John G. Sheehan of Boston, Massachusetts, radio still switched on and pressed to his ear, takes a well-earned rest atop Hill 875 following its capture by elements of the 173rd Airborne Brigade, November 24th, 1967. Conquest of the hill ended five days of what some consider the bitterest fighting of the Vietnam War.





    Battalion Seas Arriving in South Vietnam

    An amphibious task group of Second Battalion, Third Marines lands along the coast of South Vietnam, 15 miles north of Hue on July 20th, 1967. The Amtracks transported the Marines from landing ships in the South China Sea to the assault beach.

    This mission called "Bear Chain" operation was the thirty-fourth assault that Pacific Fleet Amphibious Force ships had launched on the North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong positions in South Vietnam, since March 1965.



    Soldier Firing His Machine Gun

    Private First Class Milton L. Cook is ready to fire his M-60 machine gun into a wooded area from which sniper fire had been received 10 miles northeast of Cu Chi, Vietnam. He is a member of the 25th infantry division. April 17, 1967




    American Tank Fords a River

    Members of the 5th Mechanical Division ford a river in a tank, Can Lo River, south of Con Thien, Vietnam. 1968

    The M48A3 battle tank was the heaviest tank used in vietnam. It had a crew of four, was armed with a 90mm cannon with a coaxial .30-inch machine gun and an externally mounted .50-inch machine gun.




    Close up Portrait of Sleeping US Marine.

    A U.S Marine is taking a rest with his machine gun still in hand and ammunition draped across his chest. February 23rd, 1968.




    An American 9th Division machine gunner swathed in bullet belts, smokes a cigarette, 1968.




    A US soldier after a 6-day patrol in the Da Nang region of Vietnam, 1968.

    Da Nang was one of the most important ports in the Central Lowlands of Vietnam. It became the second largest urban area after Saigon, in South Vietnam, due to the large concentration of refugees and troops. Da Nang had a large air base and was therefore the site of the first landing of ground forces (two Marine battalions) on March 8th, 1965, marking the beginning of a US commitment of ground forces to Vietnam.




    Troops Relax During Christmas Cease Fire

    Troops of the mechanized units of the 25th Infantry Division take a break during a Christmas cease fire, Christmas day, at Fire Base Evans, Cu Chi, 40 miles west of Saigon.




    A US soldier from the 9th Division smokes a long pipe whilst sitting in long grass, 1968.

    In 1969, a Defense Department study showed that 20 percent of US soldiers in Vietnam were using marijuana either occasionally or frequently. By 1969, military police were arresting 1,000 soldiers per week for possession. Heroin use also spread within a small group of soldiers and was readily available for only 2-3 dollars per dose. Drug urine analysis tests were performed on some soldiers before returning home. However, the majority of the soldiers did not use drugs as popular myth may suggest.




    Gunners Firing from Helicopter

    Sighting the enemy, the door gunner aboard a "Huey" opens fire on a target below. UH-1B armed helicopters of Light Helicopter Attack Squadron THREE, Detachment 7, under the command of Lieutenant Commander William D. Martin, U.S.N., team up with Navy River Patrol Boats on search and destroy missions against Viet Cong positions in the Mekong Delta.




    M113 Armored Personnel Carriers

    United States 25th Division troops ride on top of M113 Armored Personnel Carriers (APC) in Ambush Alley, on the Tay Ninh-Dau Tieng road, 1968.




    A US army Loach scout helicopter corrals Vietnamese villagers and their livestock near Ba Xoai, 1968. The OH-6 light observation helicopters nicknamed "loaches" from the acronym LOH, were the eyes in the field of the US infantry. Notice the co-pilot giving a wave





    A helicopter pilot points out something to his copilot in the cockpit of a US UH1 helicopter gun ship over the Mekong River Delta, 1968. The "Huey" became known as the workhorse of Vietnam. It could be adapted to many functions such as troop transport, medical evacuation and use as a gunship. No other machine saved as many lives during the war as the Medevac Hueys.



    Support troops from the US 25th Division take cover from the force of a US helicopter's rotor wash as it lands near Duc Co, Vietnam, 1965.
    Last edited by PrincessPeach; 1 Week Ago at 02:13 PM.

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    Very very nice pics.

    thanks.

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    What's up with the nazi cross?

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    What's up with the nazi cross?
    It isn't....
    check out this link: http://www.luckymojo.com/swastika.html

    Thanks for the pics... cool!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Marine

    What's up with the nazi cross?
    Guess he's trying to show the Irony of it? I dunno.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Marine

    What's up with the nazi cross?
    The swastika (Sanskrit "good luck" or "well-being", literally "blessed form") is a cross with its arms bent 90 degrees to either right or left. (Geometrically, it might be regarded as an irregular icosagon, a 20-sided polygon.)

    The swastika appears in art and design throughout human history, symbolising many different things; such as luck, Brahma, the Hindu concept of samsara, or Surya (the sun).

    The swastika is used primarily as a symbol by Hindus -- it was first mentioned in the Vedas, the holy texts of Hinduism -- but transferred to followers of other Indic religions like Buddhists and Jains.

    A possibly spurious modern tradition has it that only a right-facing or clockwise swastika (as depicted above) is a good luck symbol, whereas a left-facing or counterclockwise swastika is a bad omen, labelled a sauwastika. There is little evidence of this distinction in Hindu history from which it is derived and, although the "standard" form is the right-facing swastika, Hindus all over India and Nepal still use the symbol in both orientations for the sake of balance. Buddhists almost always use the left-facing swastika.

    In the early twentieth century the National Socialist German Workers Party adopted the swastika as its emblem and since World War II, most Westerners see it as solely a fascist symbol, leading to unfortunate assumptions about its pre-Nazi use.

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    OK thanks guys, didn't know that

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    Quote Originally Posted by S'13
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Marine

    What's up with the nazi cross?
    The swastika (Sanskrit "good luck" or "well-being", literally "blessed form") is a cross with its arms bent 90 degrees to either right or left. (Geometrically, it might be regarded as an irregular icosagon, a 20-sided polygon.)

    The swastika appears in art and design throughout human history, symbolising many different things; such as luck, Brahma, the Hindu concept of samsara, or Surya (the sun).

    The swastika is used primarily as a symbol by Hindus -- it was first mentioned in the Vedas, the holy texts of Hinduism -- but transferred to followers of other Indic religions like Buddhists and Jains.

    A possibly spurious modern tradition has it that only a right-facing or clockwise swastika (as depicted above) is a good luck symbol, whereas a left-facing or counterclockwise swastika is a bad omen, labelled a sauwastika. There is little evidence of this distinction in Hindu history from which it is derived and, although the "standard" form is the right-facing swastika, Hindus all over India and Nepal still use the symbol in both orientations for the sake of balance. Buddhists almost always use the left-facing swastika.

    In the early twentieth century the National Socialist German Workers Party adopted the swastika as its emblem and since World War II, most Westerners see it as solely a fascist symbol, leading to unfortunate assumptions about its pre-Nazi use.
    guess it dont bring luck... the nazis did lose 2 world wars

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    nice pics

    LEST WE FORGET

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    There's an old building here in town that has counter clockwise swastikas built in to it for decorative purposes. The local Navajo tribe uses it as well hence where they got the idea from.

    The building itself is over 100 years old.

    I agree that the nazi's destroyed whatever meaning it ever had here in the west.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnFee
    Quote Originally Posted by S'13
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Marine

    What's up with the nazi cross?
    The swastika (Sanskrit "good luck" or "well-being", literally "blessed form") is a cross with its arms bent 90 degrees to either right or left. (Geometrically, it might be regarded as an irregular icosagon, a 20-sided polygon.)

    The swastika appears in art and design throughout human history, symbolising many different things; such as luck, Brahma, the Hindu concept of samsara, or Surya (the sun).

    The swastika is used primarily as a symbol by Hindus -- it was first mentioned in the Vedas, the holy texts of Hinduism -- but transferred to followers of other Indic religions like Buddhists and Jains.

    A possibly spurious modern tradition has it that only a right-facing or clockwise swastika (as depicted above) is a good luck symbol, whereas a left-facing or counterclockwise swastika is a bad omen, labelled a sauwastika. There is little evidence of this distinction in Hindu history from which it is derived and, although the "standard" form is the right-facing swastika, Hindus all over India and Nepal still use the symbol in both orientations for the sake of balance. Buddhists almost always use the left-facing swastika.

    In the early twentieth century the National Socialist German Workers Party adopted the swastika as its emblem and since World War II, most Westerners see it as solely a fascist symbol, leading to unfortunate assumptions about its pre-Nazi use.
    guess it dont bring luck... the nazis did lose 2 world wars
    Well the Germans did, Nazis were only there in WWII

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    Btw, nice pics!!

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    guess it dont bring luck... the nazis did lose 2 world wars
    Really?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnFee
    Quote Originally Posted by S'13
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Marine

    What's up with the nazi cross?
    The swastika (Sanskrit "good luck" or "well-being", literally "blessed form") is a cross with its arms bent 90 degrees to either right or left. (Geometrically, it might be regarded as an irregular icosagon, a 20-sided polygon.)

    The swastika appears in art and design throughout human history, symbolising many different things; such as luck, Brahma, the Hindu concept of samsara, or Surya (the sun).

    The swastika is used primarily as a symbol by Hindus -- it was first mentioned in the Vedas, the holy texts of Hinduism -- but transferred to followers of other Indic religions like Buddhists and Jains.

    A possibly spurious modern tradition has it that only a right-facing or clockwise swastika (as depicted above) is a good luck symbol, whereas a left-facing or counterclockwise swastika is a bad omen, labelled a sauwastika. There is little evidence of this distinction in Hindu history from which it is derived and, although the "standard" form is the right-facing swastika, Hindus all over India and Nepal still use the symbol in both orientations for the sake of balance. Buddhists almost always use the left-facing swastika.

    In the early twentieth century the National Socialist German Workers Party adopted the swastika as its emblem and since World War II, most Westerners see it as solely a fascist symbol, leading to unfortunate assumptions about its pre-Nazi use.
    guess it dont bring luck... the nazis did lose 2 world wars
    AFAIK, the Nazi party didn't even exist in WW1

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnFee
    Quote Originally Posted by S'13
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Marine

    What's up with the nazi cross?
    The swastika (Sanskrit "good luck" or "well-being", literally "blessed form") is a cross with its arms bent 90 degrees to either right or left. (Geometrically, it might be regarded as an irregular icosagon, a 20-sided polygon.)

    The swastika appears in art and design throughout human history, symbolising many different things; such as luck, Brahma, the Hindu concept of samsara, or Surya (the sun).

    The swastika is used primarily as a symbol by Hindus -- it was first mentioned in the Vedas, the holy texts of Hinduism -- but transferred to followers of other Indic religions like Buddhists and Jains.

    A possibly spurious modern tradition has it that only a right-facing or clockwise swastika (as depicted above) is a good luck symbol, whereas a left-facing or counterclockwise swastika is a bad omen, labelled a sauwastika. There is little evidence of this distinction in Hindu history from which it is derived and, although the "standard" form is the right-facing swastika, Hindus all over India and Nepal still use the symbol in both orientations for the sake of balance. Buddhists almost always use the left-facing swastika.

    In the early twentieth century the National Socialist German Workers Party adopted the swastika as its emblem and since World War II, most Westerners see it as solely a fascist symbol, leading to unfortunate assumptions about its pre-Nazi use.
    guess it dont bring luck... the nazis did lose 2 world wars
    Well the Germans did, Nazis were only there in WWII
    damn my errors... yes you right well still dont bring luck, they lost the war

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