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Thread: Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life

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    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    Default Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life

    Sep 20, 2013 08:03 PM ET
    by Rossella Lorenzi


    The skeletonized body of an Etruscan prince, possibly a relative to Tarquinius Priscus, the legendary fifth king of Rome from 616 to 579 B.C., has been brought to light in an extraordinary finding that promises to reveal new insights on one of the ancient world’s most fascinating cultures.

    Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods.

    More: http://news.discovery.com/history/ar...ome-130920.htm

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    Senior Member Pandemonium's Avatar
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    Ok, now that was an impressive discovery, can only image the cheer thrill of removing that slab stone and opening a portal to the past, thanks

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    Thanks for the article!

    I find the entire Etruscan civilization extremely interesting, most of us have all learned about the ancient Greeks, Persians and Egyptians thriving in their periods of time, but unknown to many there was a sophisticated civilization existing in large parts of Italy long before the Romans were going to stir up the neighborhood. The rights of woman within Etruscan society were huge compared to the Greek and Roman worlds, they were excellent fighters and made beautiful artifacts. The whole problem like in ancient Greece, they were a collection of city states all with their own policies, only in time of great danger did they work together to fight the common enemy. Only Veii wasn't part of this coalition, had they been a part of this, they could of crushed Rome even before it started to expand into Latium. The decline of the Etruscans started with the Greeks gaining naval superiority and later with the grand expansion of Rome into all of Italy.

    The Romans derived huge parts of their culture from the Etruscans, but they are still a very mysterious people due to the fact we can't read a good part of their language. The Minoans 2.0

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    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    You're both most welcome.

    The grave goods were quite interesting. Even a plate of food.

    The mention of an Etruscan king reminds of a part of the Lays of Ancient Rome, Horatius

    "Shame on the false Etruscan
    Who lingers in his home,
    When Porsena of Clusium
    Is on the march for Rome."

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    Senior Member socom6's Avatar
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    A strange people, those Etruscans. Dont know where the heck they came from. All i know they were highly civilised and lived in Italy.

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    L O L A JCR's Avatar
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    Etruscans are fascinating. We can't even understand their language.

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    Senior Member danielc's Avatar
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    Fascinating finding. Looking forward to hearing more about it. I'm pretty sure the Etruscans didn't disappear from the world, they just got absorbed into the Roman state, and become Romans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danielc View Post
    Fascinating finding. Looking forward to hearing more about it. I'm pretty sure the Etruscans didn't disappear from the world, they just got absorbed into the Roman state, and become Romans.
    The Etruscan people were actually only a relatively small layer of people within the Etruscan society, the common people were the "conquered people" like the Latins and the Umbrians. Absorption went relatively easy I guess, but don't forget the Romans were experts in murdering entire cities, I don't think much of the Etruscan elite survived the absorption into the Roman Republic.



    The Greeks and Romans looked with horror with how Etruscan females were nearly equal to their male counterparts, socially the Etruscans were superior to the Romans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by socom6 View Post
    A strange people, those Etruscans. Dont know where the heck they came from. All i know they were highly civilised and lived in Italy.
    That about sums up more or less what everyone for sure knows about those guys. Wish the Gaul didnt give Rome the works, because with more Roman historical records in tact we would possibly know so much more about Etruscans and Rome in monarchic times, before they made it big.

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    Senior Member IraGlacialis's Avatar
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    Awesome find. Besides the stuff you can find in tombs, it's amazing how much we can glean from a person's lifestyle by their skeleton.
    Quote Originally Posted by Belisarius View Post
    The Etruscan people were actually only a relatively small layer of people within the Etruscan society, the common people were the "conquered people" like the Latins and the Umbrians.
    I think that's something you could apply to Roman civilization as well, especially in the imperial era.

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