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Thread: How Does A Sabot Round Work?

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    Member MKtexan's Avatar
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    Default How Does A Sabot Round Work?

    I heard that it goes straight through a tank and sucks out the crew from the tank through the small hole it creates and leaves the tank in tact.

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    Default Re: How Does A Sabot Round Work?

    Quote Originally Posted by MKtexan
    I heard that it goes straight through a tank and sucks out the crew from the tank through the small hole it creates and leaves the tank in tact.
    It also has an effect on gravity that leaves everything around the tank to be turned upside down.

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    Senior Member ronin2172's Avatar
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    Default Re: How Does A Sabot Round Work?

    Quote Originally Posted by MKtexan
    I heard that it goes straight through a tank and sucks out the crew from the tank through the small hole it creates and leaves the tank in tact.
    i hope u r joking!

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    Default Re: How Does A Sabot Round Work?

    Quote Originally Posted by †Seraphim†
    Quote Originally Posted by MKtexan
    I heard that it goes straight through a tank and sucks out the crew from the tank through the small hole it creates and leaves the tank in tact.
    It also has an effect on gravity that leaves everything around the tank to be turned upside down.
    thanks for your sarcasm, i did not ask for it. Hey, im only telling you people what i was told by an active Army tanker, who is now my recruiter, i dont know anything about it, it did not come here to have people be jerks, i came here to ask a question. so post nicely, or leave.

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    Default Re: How Does A Sabot Round Work?

    Quote Originally Posted by MKtexan
    I heard that it goes straight through a tank and sucks out the crew from the tank through the small hole it creates and leaves the tank in tact.
    A SABOT round is a kinetic energy round, essentially it is a spike fired at extremely high velocity that is usually made of tungsten or depleted uranium.

    The velocity at which these rounds are fired enable them to burrow their way through armor. The armor that is displaced enters the crew compartment as molten spall, which usually results in a catastrophic kill.

    I've heard the story about tank crews being sucked out of the exit hole as well, and I consider this to be the tanker myth of an urban legend. As a former 19K I had the opportunity to examine several Iraqi armored vehicles hit by APFSDS rounds, and the damage to the tank via secondary explosions usually resulted in the turret being blown completely away from the vehicle. The vehicles were anything but intact.

    Some additional information available for you here:

    http://www.army-technology.com/contr...ion/apfsds.htm

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    Default Re: How Does A Sabot Round Work?

    Quote Originally Posted by MKtexan
    Quote Originally Posted by †Seraphim†
    Quote Originally Posted by MKtexan
    I heard that it goes straight through a tank and sucks out the crew from the tank through the small hole it creates and leaves the tank in tact.
    It also has an effect on gravity that leaves everything around the tank to be turned upside down.
    thanks for your sarcasm, i did not ask for it. Hey, im only telling you people what i was told by an active Army tanker, who is now my recruiter, i dont know anything about it, it did not come here to have people be jerks, i came here to ask a question. so post nicely, or leave.
    Ok please dont tell your mom on us...

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/m1-tank3.htm

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    I've got your hardwood.... right here Durandal's Avatar
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    *chuckle*

    No, a sabot round is not magical.

    A sabot round is a dart (in the case of a tank round) surrounded by a "boot" or collar. After the round leaves the barrel of the tank gun, the boot sections fall away as the dart flies, fast than the speed of sound, towards its target.

    The goal of the round is to supply enough energy at a VERY small point, allowing it to penetrate.

    I have discussed the physics behind it with a person that designs tank guns and used to procure them for the military (He was responsible for getting the German 120mm gun into the M1 MBT). The way he described it, if I remember correctly, is that the enrgy tranfer of the kinetic round is such that the round does not actually punch through, per se, but atomizes both the penetrating potion of the dart and the armor. What is left usually just rattles around at a great velocity inside the tank sometimes causing a catastrophic failure (fuel or ammunition cook off) or destroying equipment and occupants...or both (obviously).

    The goal is to have a penetrator that is denser than the material you are shooting it into or the kinetic energy bleeds off to quickly and does not achieve penetration.

    Thus, for instance, a lead penetrator would simple pancake, for the most part, against most modern MBTs. That is why tungsten and depleted uranium is used. DU is the cheapest and most dense material we use in Army, but its a ***** to mill.

    The British came up with the best way to TRY to defeat this. Its called Chobam. A mixed armor package of different metals, causing the round the bleed energy more quickly on softer metals then impacting against a more dense layer.

    I may have missed some points, but in a nut shell...there ya go.

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    Senior Member Ichhabe's Avatar
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    The sabot or projectile is either made of Wolframcarbide or depleted uranium. The projectile is so heavy that when it hits the tank, its weight create kinetic enery that creates an enormous amount of heat. The tip starts to melt and by this it melts through the steel like a warm knife through butter.
    This means that when it has melted its way in to the tank you know have a rapid increase of the room temperature inside the vehicle. Maybe as high as 2000 Celsius. This usualy do the trick of setting off the ammo inside the vehicle.
    I am not so sure if it can penetrate through the whole tank and do the stuff you said, personally I think it is some kind of a myth. But of course, I would not put my hand on the Bible about it.
    If the tank doesnt blow up, the inside of the tank will anyway not look in mint condition due to the heat created inside.
    Hope this helped.

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    Avoiding Asshats, Lying Low DeltaWhisky58's Avatar
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    I think we're missing the point here. What you have talked about so far are specialist anti-tank rounds which happen to be sabot-type rounds.

    A sabot projectile, is actually a sub-calibre projectile of any sort which can be fired through a larger-calibre bore gun by means of a surrounding sabot or bore adaptor made of wood/plastic/metal which brings the sub-calibre projectile up to that gun's actual bore diameter

    sabot noun a wooden clog, or a shoe with a wooden sole, as formerly worn by the French peasantry.
    There are for example sabot rounds for 12g shotguns - an alternative type of slugs to Brenekke for example. There used to be (may still be) commercially produced (Remington or Winchester) rounds for .308 and .30-06 hunting rifles which fire a .224 calibre bullet by means of a plastic sabot. Sabot rounds for artillery guns have been with us since the Napoleonic era. There are even sabot projectiles available for .22 airguns!

    So, all of the tank rounds you talk of are sabot projectiles, but by the method of firing rather than projectile type. Most of these are actually kintic energy warheads.

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    Senior Member Ichhabe's Avatar
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    Dear DeltaWhisky58. He asked about how a Sabot round to use on a tank worked. Not the flechette ammo for shotguns.

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    In GW1, supposedly one APFSDS went thru two T-62's and killed both of them

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    Senior Member Ichhabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by American Patriot
    In GW1, supposedly one APFSDS went thru two T-62's and killed both of them
    Pictures, or it never happened.

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    Member Turbo's Avatar
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    i heard another myth of the same sort, that the gun on the A-10 did the same thing when the were testing it they put a goat in a big metal box and shot it a few times then they found the goat or the what was left of it out side the box of course i have no proof that it really happend

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    If you were to cut through the hull of a tank with a Sabot round, it's going to create heat. What happens when you heat things up? Ever tried to warm up spaghetti or lasagna in the microwave without covering it? That's right, pressure happens. If you melt the armor on a tank to the point where the molton penetrator slop pushes through, it's going to make a lot of heat inside. It's very possible that loose objects, such as pieces of equipment or body parts, will be sucked out of the open holes due to the pressure increases. I've always thought that was a myth, but i'm not in the tanking business, and I don't care to find out myself.

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    Senior Member Uncle Sam's Avatar
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    Just reiterating what a few others have mentioned...









    Sabot

    Sabot rounds work like a basic arrow. They don't have any explosive power; they penetrate armor with shear momentum. The heart of the sabot round is the penetrator -- a narrow metal rod (typically depleted uranium) with a pointed nose on one end and stabilizing fins on the other. Before the round is fired, the rear part of the penetrator is attached to a propellant case, and the front part is attached to the sabot structure. The sabot's purpose is to keep the narrow penetrator centered in the wide gun barrel.

    On firing, the propellant casing remains in the chamber, and the expanding gas pushes the sabot and attached penetrator down the barrel. The sabot is attached to the penetrator with relatively flimsy plastic, so it falls away as soon as the round leaves the cannon. The heavy penetrator flies through the air at high speed toward its target tank. Because of its narrow shape, the penetrator focuses its full force into a very small area, plowing straight through heavy armor. As the penetrator enters the tank, heated fragments of metal fly off in all directions, hitting anybody and anything inside.

    HEAT

    HEAT rounds use explosive firepower, rather than momentum, to penetrate armor. At its nose, the round has an extended impact sensor. When the impact sensor collides with a target, it ignites an explosive, which melts surrounding copper. A shape charge liner concentrates the molten metal and hot gases into a narrow blast that cuts through the armor.

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