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Thread: Finnish mortar company

  1. #16
    Banned user Nrom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kekkonen
    Very nice pictures Cheese! And I agree with the dude somewhere up there that said that it´s nice with the added personal comments.

    And as for identifying that. I hope you bastards didn´t fire at a wartime StuG like has been done way too many times already on Finnish live fire ranges. But I don´t think it is a StuG, it has too few wheels. Same goes for a BTR-50 and a PT-76 so my guess would be a former Finnish T-54?
    BMP1?

  2. #17
    Senior Member tenda's Avatar
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    Talking yo

    Quote Originally Posted by Upfrontreporting
    Interesting mix of NATO and Russian gear, good pics.
    x 2 ...really interestings...!!!

  3. #18
    Senior Member tenda's Avatar
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    Talking yo

    Quote Originally Posted by Nrom
    BMP1?
    mhhhhhhh...looks like a t54/55...

  4. #19
    Banned user Nrom's Avatar
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    That must be a great job for that guy who have that soldier on his back...

  5. #20
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    Hello!

    Great pics!

    Ahh!Rovajärvi..Dangerous place for reindeers . I have been there too,but already over year ago.
    Did you visited in "sotku" there? It`s nice,oldstylish place and if i remember correctly,there`s even a fireplace in it.

    Turre

    P.S.Jaahas,teilläkös oli sissikaminat käytössä?
    Last edited by Turre; 10-18-2005 at 03:24 PM.

  6. #21
    Member V/E's Avatar
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    Great pix, well done!

  7. #22
    Senior Member Bluezoo's Avatar
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    Excellent pictures!

  8. #23

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    very very nice pics, thanks for posting them

    btw, how many months is compulsory service in Finnish army?

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turre
    Hello!

    Great pics!

    Ahh!Rovajärvi..Dangerous place for reindeers . I have been there too,but already over year ago.
    Did you visited in "sotku" there? It`s nice,oldstylish place and if i remember correctly,there`s even a fireplace in it.

    Turre

    P.S.Jaahas,teilläkös oli sissikaminat käytössä?
    Yep, our confirmed kills of reindeers was only two

    I visited sotku couple of times, as we were sleeping only three night's at that camp site. And there was a fireplace... nice place, i agree that.

    Our company was using one pj-tent for mortar number 2 and for manual taso, in case of computer fault. Mortars 1 and 3 were using Sissi-tent's for sleeping. Not so bad choice, because sissi-tent is way more easier to warm up, and very light. I am 185 cm's tall and there was enought room for eight people, when we left our backpacks to our 'Masi'.
    Last edited by Juusto; 10-18-2005 at 05:35 PM.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juusto
    Our company was using one pj-tent for mortar number 2 and for manual keskiö, in case of computer fault.
    Manual keskiö? As for the computers I guess you mean (something more modern) or these on the pictures. But what does manual mean? A pen and a paper and some genius good on math?




  11. #26
    Senior Member OldRecon's Avatar
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    How long have the Finish armed forces used 120 mm mortars?
    A development originaly based on captured Soviet 120 mm mortars like the M-1938?
    I guess there have been several marks/variants on the 120 mm team who have been developed and used in service since WW-2?
    It's Tampela who make them?


    Originaly wondered if this was one of the Comet cruiser tanks once employed by Finland, though on the basis of the sloped front plate I'll go with the T-54/55 option too.

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johan M
    very very nice pics, thanks for posting them

    btw, how many months is compulsory service in Finnish army?
    6 months is minimum for 'non-special' mens ie. artillery,mortars,rifle,engineers...
    9 months for MP's, medics and truck drivers for example.
    12 months for Corporals and Officer cadets.

  13. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kekkonen
    Manual keskiö? As for the computers I guess you mean (something more modern) or these on the pictures. But what does manual mean? A pen and a paper and some genius good on math?
    Oh... my fault. I meant 'manual taso' and it's just pen and paper.
    Keskiö is always computerized, I quess

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldRecon
    How long have the Finish armed forces used 120 mm mortars?
    A development originaly based on captured Soviet 120 mm mortars like the M-1938?
    I guess there have been several marks/variants on the 120 mm team who have been developed and used in service since WW-2?
    It's Tampela who make them?
    The Finnish army started experimenting with mortars in the 1920´s when they bought the first 81 mm mortars.



    The work on the first Finnish 120 mm mortar was started in 1935 by Tampella, and the first prototype was ready before the Winter War, but full-scale production didn´t start before the war ended. During the short peace-time between the Winter War and the Continuation War the Finns mass-produced them however and they were used with success during the assault phase of the Continuation War (well close combat supported with heavy grenades before the assault is always good I guess). The Swedes were so impressed that they ordered it, and they still have it in their inventory as the 12 cm Grk m/41D, so it has served Sweden well for 64 years now


    12 cm Grk m/41D being loaded with
    a guided STRIX anti-tank round


    During the war the Finnish Army also wanted something heavier to be used against fortified positions, so Tampella developed a 300 mm heavy mortar, "The poor peoples Stuka "



    Tampella was around for some decades after the war. They sold the license of some heavy howitzer to Israel for example. However it´s now part of the Patria industrial group I think. The current Finnish 81 mm and 120 mm mortars are basically the same as the old ones, although lighter than the old ones, and have longer range. Finns still have captured Soviet 82 mm mortars in the inventory, used as fortress mortars by the Navy.

  15. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldRecon
    How long have the Finish armed forces used 120 mm mortars?
    A development originaly based on captured Soviet 120 mm mortars like the M-1938?
    I guess there have been several marks/variants on the 120 mm team who have been developed and used in service since WW-2?
    It's Tampela who make them?
    Tampella started development of 120mm mortar 1935, and first model named 120krh/40 was issued 1940. I'm not sure if 120krh 92 is based on Soviet mortars, ... can be true. So called "model Tampella" is widely regocnized all over world today, and many expert's believe that 120mm KRH 92 is the best heavy mortar in the world.

    Tampella no more manufactures mortars as it's weapon production is owned by finnish Patria weapon systems nowdays.

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