Thread: Snipers

  1. #1636
    Junior Member Harmet's Avatar
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    Identify an riflescopes.

  2. #1637
    Member Jass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harmet View Post
    Identify an riflescopes.
    I know what type it is... Im just not going to tell you..

    maybe this short video wil help you:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Btrvd-1m-v4

  3. #1638

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    it is an AN/PVS 10 day/night sight

  4. #1639

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    Quote Originally Posted by chaloopy View Post
    This guy should be one of the poster boys for crye multicam
    na. CYRE wouldn't use them without extensively retouching them. Those guys are reflecting like a mirror. Need to hit those with some flat black rattlecan before you use them.

  5. #1640
    Senior Member Fireball Sanchez's Avatar
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    Arrow Snipers

    [IMG]http://i31.*******.com/n3xi82dotjpg[/IMG]
    Hires.
    M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper System sits on top of a berm waiting for one of the Army's elite marksmen to handle the weapon for the first time at Fort Lewis, Wash., July 15. The Army is now phasing in as the new weapon of choice for Army snipers.
    (Photo by Pvt. Jarrett Branch : 17th Public Affairs Detachment)
    [IMG]http://i31.*******.com/u576bdotjpg[/IMG]
    Hires.
    Sgt. Davin Rose, a Soldier with A Co 1/38th, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, scopes out a target a few hundred meters away while testing out the new M110 SASS at Fort Lewis, Wash., July 15.
    (Photo by Pvt. Jarrett Branch : 17th Public Affairs Detachment)
    [IMG]http://i30.*******.com/in5uf8dotjpg[/IMG]
    Hires.
    Sgt. James Clark, from Atlanta Ga., the sniper section leader with the Recon 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Division, peers down range as Soldiers place targets at various distances at Fort Lewis, Wash., July 15. Clark said his favorite part about being part of a sniper team is being a spotter.
    (Photo by Pvt. Jarrett Branch : 17th Public Affairs Detachment)
    [SIZE="4"][*******"Red"]Snipers Take Aim[/COLOR][/SIZE]

    Story by Pvt. Jarrett Branch : 17th Public Affairs Detachment

    FORT LEWIS, Wash. He laid perfectly still as he concentrated on the target 600 meters in front of him. His spotter peered through the scope and jotted down a few things in his field notebook. The spotter leaned over and told the shooter the vital information needed to take out their target. Once the shooter was ready, he focused all his effort as he prepared to take the shot.

    Having to consider distance, elevation and weather conditions, shooters have to adjust their weapon to make sure the first shot is the last shot.

    The Army is fielding the M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper System to help snipers hit their target. The M110 SASS was dubbed by the Army as one of the inventions of 2007. The M110 SASS was tested by snipers in 5th Striker Brigade Combat Team at Fort Lewis, Wash., July 15.

    "Versions of this rifle have been out for a while now, but this is one of the newer models," said Sgt. James Clark, sniper section leader for 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment. "The M110 SASS will be replacing the previously used SR-25."

    The snipers arrived at the range in the early morning and began prepping the weapons to be fired. After they made sure that all the weapons were ready for the task at hand, the snipers made their way to the firing line. The Soldiers got in position, pointed the rifles down range, and waited for their spotters to give them the correct windage and elevation needed to hit the target.

    Once they had all the information, the snipers opened fire. The Soldiers performed a few tasks with the M110 SASS such as zeroing the weapon and taking practice shots necessary to break in the weapon. For many of the Soldiers, it was the first time that they ever fired the M110 SASS and they were very pleased with the results.

    "So far, so good," said Clark, from Atlanta. "It just takes some time to get used to. It's pretty much shoots like an M-16."

    Not every Soldier gets the opportunity to fire this rifle or be a part of the two-man sniper team. The Soldiers who are selected to be snipers must go through series of events before they earn the right to be called a sniper.

    "The snipers are handpicked to have this job because of their skills and abilities," said Clark.

    Unit commanders handpick Soldiers who excel in marksmanship for sniper school.

    Pfc. Walter Williams, a sniper with the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, recalled how he became a sniper. "One day the scouts were having a platoon day. We went out to the range and everyone shot M-4s. Whoever's shot group was the strongest and hit 40 out of 40 targets were sent to sniper school."

    Williams, from Panama City, Fla., was one of a handful of Soldiers in 5th Striker Brigade Combat Team who was able to shoot the M110 SASS.

    The M110 SASS is giving snipers across the Army the ability to make that one shot count.

  6. #1641
    Senior Member Ravage's Avatar
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    Great photos EMT =]

    The M110 SASS will be replacing the previously used SR-25.
    Talk about a change of heart.

  7. #1642

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    Norwegian Marksman /w HK-417, 2nd battalion.
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  8. #1643
    Senior Member Dave76's Avatar
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    Sergeant Adelbert F. Waldron, III. 9th Infantry Division. 109 confirmed kills, making him the most successful sniper of the Viet Nam war. Sgt Waldron also earned two Distinguished Service Crosses.

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    ANZAC Moderator Ngati Tumatauenga's Avatar
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    Interesting how little info is available about him compared to Hathcock, Mawhinney, etc.

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    Banned user HorrigEn's Avatar
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  11. #1646
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ngati Tumatauenga View Post
    Interesting how little info is available about him compared to Hathcock, Mawhinney, etc.
    Yeah amazing how much is known of the above 2, considering what he achieved and in such a short time in country, with some pretty inovative methods. His reports make some interesting reading....almost "Required reading" eh Ngati

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    Senior Member Alex-L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jass View Post
    I know what type it is... Im just not going to tell you..

    maybe this short video wil help you:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Btrvd-1m-v4
    May I ask what you intended the search terms to be smartass? Cause i have zero idea what that scope is and I wouldn't know how to google it other then...Sniper rifle scope

  13. #1648
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex-L View Post
    May I ask what you intended the search terms to be smartass? Cause i have zero idea what that scope is and I wouldn't know how to google it other then...Sniper rifle scope
    Oh yeah sorry about that post, was in a bad mood.
    Anyways, It took me 2 min to find it in google.

    My search term was "M24 night scope", (cose of its size) then page 3 you see a pic of the exact same scope. click it, and there it gives you the name: "AN/PVS-10 Day+Night Vision Sniper Scope"

    I even thing this particular scope hase been discussed in this thread.

  14. #1649
    ANZAC Moderator Ngati Tumatauenga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gafkiwi View Post
    Yeah amazing how much is known of the above 2, considering what he achieved and in such a short time in country, with some pretty inovative methods. His reports make some interesting reading....almost "Required reading" eh Ngati
    Very much so.

    It's interesting to note the different 'styles' (for want of a better term) employed by the USMC vs USA in sniping operations over there. The USA generally seemed to take a more technology based/production line approach/teams embedded as part of the fire's plan, whereas the USMC took the 'purist' route/autonomous teams route.

  15. #1650
    Senior Member goat89's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ngati Tumatauenga View Post
    Very much so.

    It's interesting to note the different 'styles' (for want of a better term) employed by the USMC vs USA in sniping operations over there. The USA generally seemed to take a more technology based/production line approach/teams embedded as part of the fire's plan, whereas the USMC took the 'purist' route/autonomous teams route.
    Really? I never actually noticed that. Could it be due to budget constraints?

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