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Thread: How the SR-71 Blackbird's Engines Work

  1. #1
    Senior Member budanski's Avatar
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    Default How the SR-71 Blackbird's Engines Work



    Not only can the SR-71's engines push it to speeds above mach 3, but it can sustain those speeds for extended periods of time, at high efficiency. This is how it does it.

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    Senior Member Universals's Avatar
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    Pretty cool....Not that I understand half the stuff on there
    Last edited by Universals; 10-17-2014 at 10:40 PM.

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    Member KPC's Avatar
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    Interesting.

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    Member Banaantjes's Avatar
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    In a few years this engine is 60 years old. One can only be amazed by the skill of the people who worked on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Banaantjes View Post
    In a few years this engine is 60 years old. One can only be amazed by the skill of the people who worked on it.
    Was thinking about the same. We are talking about an engine designed and produced more than half a century ago. No computers, no autoCAD, no virtual simulators. Only pencils, paper, slide rules and lots of math. Really impressive.

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    How's that Hopey Changey thing workin'? C.Puffs's Avatar
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    One thing that this video really makes clear is the fact that, in the Blackbirds, the J58 is just the centerpiece of a larger propulsion system. When you see commentary in other sources mentioning the J58 having been considered for other aircraft (XF8U-3 Crusader, a variant of the A-5 Vigilante, B-58 variants, etc.) they would have all used the engine as a conventional turbojet. Those J58s didn't have the bypass pipes or the elaborate air routing system that transforms the engine nacelles in the Blackbirds into turboramjets. He did forget to mention ejector flap positions. Oh well.

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    Member ljrmisty's Avatar
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    Suck in doors. Who knew? Engineers with slide rules, that's who. Awesome video. Needs to be watched multiple times.

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    Member mokokko's Avatar
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    Why do other fighter turbojet engines not use bypass tubes for better afterburning ? it seemed very uselfull indeed.

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    Basically, for a fighter aircraft, the extra weight, complexity, and diameter aren't worth the small increase in usable afterburner duration.

    Even though a bypass tube looks simple, you have to mount the jet engine inside it, and then provide access through it for maintenance.

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