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Thread: WW2 Aviation art

  1. #1
    Skaman
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    Default WW2 Aviation art



    Pilot Officer John Bisley of 126 Squadron in combat with Me 109s from JG-53 during one of the intense aerial air battles over Valetta in April 1942. Between the summer of 1940 and the end of 1942, Malta became one of the most bombed places on earth. The RAF’s desperate fight to retain control of the diminutive Mediterranean island, and the defiant courage of the people of Malta, is one of the epic stories of World War Two. Signed by six Spitfire pilots who flew in the defence of Malta.


    The morning of 19 July 1944 saw the USAAF’s 8th and 15th Air Forces mount an attack of awesome proportion against the aircraft factories in the region of Munich. To combat a seemingly overwhelming force of 1400 bombers and almost as many fighter escorts, the Luftwaffe were able to put up just three Gruppen from JG300 and one from JG302, flying a mix of Me109G’s and Fw190’s – barely 50 serviceable fighters between them. They were joined by a dozen Me109’s of
    II./JG27, these fighters desperately trying to defend the very factories in which they were made.
    Shown are the Messerschmitt Me109G’s of II./JG27, sporting their sage green ‘Defence of the Reich’ markings, returning to base at Fels am Wagram after the ferocious combat fought on that warm summer day. A P-38 Lightning, one of 47 Allied aircraft brought down during the air fighting, lies crash-landed in the spectacular Bavarian countryside, testimony to the fact that this is still very much “Messerschmitt Country”.


    Dawn on a crisp February morning in 1945 at Brandenburg-Briest, Germany. Walter Schuck returns from a brief test flight in his Me 262 jet to discover that the air***** is under attack by American fighters. Whilst Me 109's dive in to defend the base,
    P-51 Mustangs harass Schuck, as P-47 Thunderbolts bomb the hangars.
    Signed by Luftwaffe pilots; Walter Schuck - Kurt Schulze - Theo Nau - Fritz Wiener. U.S. fighter pilots; Robert Winks - Norm Achen - Robert Wright - Raymond Tolliver


    A tribute to the bomber crews who flew with RAF Bomber Command throughout it's arduous six year campaign. True to their squadron motto “Strike and Return”, Lancasters of 460 Squadron RAAF, return to RAF Binbrook in Lincolnshire following a daylight raid over Germany in the late winter of 1944.
    Signed by four highly decorated pilots who flew with RAF Bomber Command during World War II. Pat Cardon - Bob Knights - Tony Iveson - Bill North.


    "Gustav!"


    Chuck Yeager make a low pass over his first Me262 jet fighter 'kill'.
    Signed by Chuck Yeager.


    "Strange Encounter"


    "Marianas Turkey Shoot"

    P-40 fighters of the 325th FG, 12th AF, the dreaded Checkertail Clan, as they attack a German tank column in the African desert during the defeat of Field Marshal Erwin Rommel's Afrika Korps' in Tunisia in the early spring of 1943.
    Signed by the artist.


    Originally produced to announce and commemorate Heinz Krebs' first one-man art exhibition in the United States. This exhibition poster shows a reproduction of 'Checkmate', Heinz' most popular painting in the U.S.A. It is lavishly produced using a six-color process, the image being surrounded by a platinum keyline. The heading, which is also printed in the same platinum ink, and the white text under the image area, stand out beautifully against the matte dark blue border of the poster. All posters have been spot varnished for optimum protection.


    April 13th 1944. Crossing the Channel coast, lone survivor of the 545th BS, B-17G Squawkin' Chicken, flown by Lt. Dewayne Bennett galantly fights back a last attempt by Luftwaffe fighters to down her after the raid on Schweinfurt.
    Signed by Dewayne Bennett, and two German fighter pilots of JG-1.


    Eatern Front,Winter, 1943. Horst Petzschler flies escort for a Stuka attack on Russian armour, which has been ambushed by German tanks near Smolensk.
    Signed by: Horst Petzschler, and Oscar Boesch.


    The first of three prints in Robert Bailey's "Luftwaffe Over Europe" set, depicts Siegfried Mueller and Oscar Boesch as they attack the airfield at Eindhoven, Holland, on 1st. January 1945. During this raid the R.A.F. lost sixty aircraft, a large number of which were Typhoons.
    Signed by: Siegfried Mueller - Oscar Boesch - Richard Franz - Theo Nau -


    Ju-88 bombers of III/KG-30 attack convoy PQ-17 en route to Russia, with vital
    war supplies from the west. Each print is signed by Hajo Herrmann, a highly decorated bomber commander who took part in the attack on PQ-17, and four naval veterans of the Arctic convoys.


    Having just escaped from Munich with the advancing Americans only minutes away, Oberstleutnant Heinz Bär, last commander of JV-44, leads his flight of Me262s to their mountain hideaway at Salzburg, 29th April 1945. Later the same day Bär claimed a P-47 Thunderbolt in a final act of defiance.
    Signed by Walter Schuck - Herman Buchner - Werner Roell. All Me 262 pilots, and all recipients of the Knight's Cross.


    Hurricanes of 111 Squadron attack Do.17s during the Battle of Britain.
    Signed by: John Ellacombe, Alec Ingle, and John Peel.


    A Ju 88 G-6 piloted by Maj. Paul Zorner, commander of NJG 100 attacks and severely damages an RAF Lancaster somewhere over Germany in late 1944.
    Signed by Maj. Paul Zorner.


    It is winter 1945. As dusk falls, the tranquillity of an English village is briefly disturbed by P-51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group as they hurry home to Leiston at the end of a hazardous escort mission over Germany.
    Signed by Bud Anderson - Robert Winks - John Skara - Raymond Conlin


    Me110s of ZG1 roar overhead as units of the 4th Panzer Division, and grenadiers of the S.S. "Das Reich" Division advance on Smolensk, Russia, summer of 1941. Signed by the artist.


    The first part of Robert Taylor's trilogy commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. In a scene that truly captures the spirit of the RAF's victory in history's longest and most bitterly fought aerial battle, a Heinkel 111 crew has finished their war in an English field as a victorious Spitfire circles above.
    Signed by 25 Battle of Britain Spitfire pilots, and includes "Defiant To The Last" signed by two Defiant aircrew. 33" x 24"


    A Lancaster has been damaged and is left far behind the main force to make its own
    perilous way home as best it can. Seeing the vulnerability of their friends, a
    Mosquito crew expose themselves to the same dangers, and throttle back to stay
    alongside the injured warbird. Dawn has broken, the visibility is unlimited. They
    have yet to make that Channel crossing and enemy fighters are in the area. The
    crew of the Lancaster struggle to maintain flying speed and enough height to bring
    their large four-engined aircraft home. Perhaps tonight they will all drink and laugh in the local pub - perhaps!
    Signed by: Bill Reid V.C., Len Sumter, Howie Wing, Fred Coney, John Costello, Lyndon Sims and Roly Hammersley.


    The first of a two piece set of prints commemorating the infamous attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, December 7th. 1941. Each print is signed by
    four crew members of the 'Nevada'.


    Commemorating the 50th. Anniversary of victory in the Pacific. Pictured are B-29s of the 499th. bomb group on the return journey from a daylight raid on Tokyo.
    At the extremity of their range, escorting P-51s peel off and head for home.
    Prints are signed by four B-29 air crew. The companion,"Fortress Under Attack" is signed by two Medal of Honor recipients, Jay Zeamer and Red Erwin.


    A Bristol Beaufighter of 144 Sqdn. takes evasive action from a Fw190 of 9/JG5
    over Fordefjord, Norway, 9th. Feb. 1945.
    Signed by the pilot and navigator of Beaufighter NE831 PL-O.
    The first piece is my favorite.

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    I think that most WW2 and WW1 aviation art has waayy too much action going on. Ive seen paintings where aircraft will do stuff that pilots would never be able to perform under any situation. But still it makes a good centerpiece in a room.

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    What country is that from?

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    Skaman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    I think that most WW2 and WW1 aviation art has waayy too much action going on. Ive seen paintings where aircraft will do stuff that pilots would never be able to perform under any situation. But still it makes a good centerpiece in a room.
    Which example are you referring to?

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    Clog Boy Haiw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vance

    What country is that from?
    Israel?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ducimus19
    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    I think that most WW2 and WW1 aviation art has waayy too much action going on. Ive seen paintings where aircraft will do stuff that pilots would never be able to perform under any situation. But still it makes a good centerpiece in a room.
    Which example are you referring to?
    Well all of them really. One that is not shown that I can think of is a painting of Hub Zemke duking it out with either a 109 or a 190, cant remember.

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    Cunning Linguist Ratamacue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haiw
    Quote Originally Posted by Vance

    What country is that from?
    Israel?
    Israel didn't exist during WW2.

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    Clog Boy Haiw's Avatar
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    Yea I know that, but maybe the pic was from later? As I remember seeing that mark on other IAF planes...

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    Jesus Crist . That Messershmit was a part of shipment to Israel from Chekoslovakia from USSR , during Israeli first war of independance , 1947 -- 1948 .
    That's a Messershmit , i am not mistaken , right ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Javehn
    Jesus Crist . That Messershmit was a part of shipment to Israel from Chekoslovakia from USSR , during Israeli first war of independance , 1947 -- 1948 .
    That's a Messershmit , i am not mistaken , right ?
    Yes its a 109. It was redesignated something once it arrived in Israel.

  11. #11
    Skaman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    Quote Originally Posted by Javehn
    Jesus Crist . That Messershmit was a part of shipment to Israel from Chekoslovakia from USSR , during Israeli first war of independance , 1947 -- 1948 .
    That's a Messershmit , i am not mistaken , right ?
    Yes its a 109. It was redesignated something once it arrived in Israel.
    What is it intercepting? It looks like a spitfire...


  12. #12
    Senior Member Marmot1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    Quote Originally Posted by Javehn
    Jesus Crist . That Messershmit was a part of shipment to Israel from Chekoslovakia from USSR , during Israeli first war of independance , 1947 -- 1948 .
    That's a Messershmit , i am not mistaken , right ?
    Yes its a 109. It was redesignated something once it arrived in Israel.
    Not it os Avia S-199 basicaly Bf-109 but with Hispano suiza(sp?) engine and build in Czech...





    Avia S-199 Mezek
    1948-1949
    Avia S-199 Mezek is based on the famous german fighter Messerschmitt Bf 109.
    Type: Single seat fighter
    Country of origin: Czechoslovakia
    Performance:
    Speed 590 km/h;
    Range 850 km.
    In May 1948 desperate for an answer to the enemy's rule of the skies, Israel bought 25 inferior Czech versions of the famed Luftwaffe fighter for the princely sum of $1.8 million. The IAF's first fighter made history immediately, stopping the Egyptian advance towards Tel-Aviv at Ashdod. Within a few days Moddy Alon scored the IAF's first aerial victories in his S-199. Despite these achievements pilots complained that the fickle Messerschmitt was so difficult to handle that "she tried to kill us on every takeoff and landing".

  13. #13
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    Sort of ironic in this case that Nazi engineering helped save the Jewish state and British engineering made that doubtful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ducimus19
    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    Quote Originally Posted by Javehn
    Jesus Crist . That Messershmit was a part of shipment to Israel from Chekoslovakia from USSR , during Israeli first war of independance , 1947 -- 1948 .
    That's a Messershmit , i am not mistaken , right ?
    Yes its a 109. It was redesignated something once it arrived in Israel.
    What is it intercepting? It looks like a spitfire...

    Egypt got a lot of Spits from the UK after the war and used them against Israel. A really neat thing to point out is Israel bought like 6 B-17s from the US and dropped bombs on some targets on the same flight from the US after purchasing them. There was one or two of them that survived long enough to fight in the 1967 Six-Day War too.

  15. #15
    Skaman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    Quote Originally Posted by ducimus19
    Quote Originally Posted by Merik
    Quote Originally Posted by Javehn
    Jesus Crist . That Messershmit was a part of shipment to Israel from Chekoslovakia from USSR , during Israeli first war of independance , 1947 -- 1948 .
    That's a Messershmit , i am not mistaken , right ?
    Yes its a 109. It was redesignated something once it arrived in Israel.
    What is it intercepting? It looks like a spitfire...

    Egypt got a lot of Spits from the UK after the war and used them against Israel. A really neat thing to point out is Israel bought like 6 B-17s from the US and dropped bombs on some targets on the same flight from the US after purchasing them. There was one or two of them that survived long enough to fight in the 1967 Six-Day War too.

    wow, I never knew about this. DO you have anymore information about this? Photos perhaps?

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