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Thread: Navy Sailing Ships of your Country

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    Default Navy Sailing Ships of your Country

    I would like to invite everyone to post pictures of beautyfull navy sailing ships from your respective countrys.

    Ill start with the Mexican ARM Cuauthemoc BE-01 training ship and Mexican Embassador of the Seas.
    [SIZE=2]The Mexican Navy's [/SIZE][FONT=Arial]270-ft[/FONT][SIZE=2] sail training ship[/SIZE][SIZE=2]Cuauhtémoc [/SIZE]

    [SIZE=2]The Cuauhtémoc is a three-masted steel barque, built specifically to train the Mexican Navy's candidate officers. Commanding Officer is Captain Roberto Gonzales Lopes.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=2]A traditional square-rigged sailing ship in all respects, although it is equipped with modern navigation aids required by maritime convention, including radar.[/SIZE]






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    Senior Member signatory's Avatar
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    Nice thread, I don't know much on this topic but here's something from Sweden anyway...

    Navy's training ships


    HMS Gladan

    HMS Falken

    Then this one is some kind of promotional ship, sailing around the word... a replica.


    Götheborg




  3. #3
    Banned user eric_from_texas's Avatar
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    [SIZE=3]The USS Constitution:[/SIZE]

    Also known as "Old Ironsides," the USS Constitution i[*******Black]s a wooden-hulled, three-masted frigate of the United States Navy. Named after the United States Constitution, she is the oldest commissioned ship afloat in the world and is still in service with the US Navy. [/COLOR]
    [*******Black]
    [/COLOR]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Constitution
    http://www.ussconstitution.navy.mil/
















    A site featuring pics and info about USN sail-powered ships of the past: http://www.archives.gov/research/mil...ing-ships.html

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    Member Combatbookworm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by signatory View Post
    Nice thread, I don't know much on this topic but here's something from Sweden anyway...

    Navy's training ships


    HMS Gladan

    HMS Falken

    Then this one is some kind of promotional ship, sailing around the word... a replica.


    Götheborg



    [*******black][FONT='Times New Roman']When I visited Sweden, I went and checked out that famous ship that sank after only sailing 200 meters out of the harbour. Was a very cool museum, and interesting story[/FONT][/COLOR]

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    Default Colombia´s Navy Insignia Ship

    COLOMBIA´S PROUD

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    Senior Member Ceriy's Avatar
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    [FONT=Verdana][SIZE=2]Ukrainian [/SIZE][/FONT]training[FONT=Verdana][SIZE=2] ship KHERSONES






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    Senior Member signatory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Combatbookworm View Post
    [*******black][FONT='Times New Roman']When I visited Sweden, I went and checked out that famous ship that sank after only sailing 200 meters out of the harbour. Was a very cool museum, and interesting story[/FONT][/COLOR]
    Ah the 'Wasa'.. 64 (!) cannon warship... yea embarrasing that it sank but as a result the country learned how to build better ones That pic I posted is of a replica trade ship with just a few cannons for self-defense against pirates etc ..

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    Cunning Linguist Ratamacue's Avatar
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    A few more pics of the USS Constitution:






    Attachments Pending Approval Attachments Pending Approval
    Last edited by Ratamacue; 11-16-2006 at 03:51 AM.

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    Like Pigpen but dirtier Eokboy's Avatar
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    Royal Malaysian Navy KLD Tunas Samudera


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    Member awangmamat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eokboy View Post
    Royal Malaysian Navy KLD Tunas Samudera

    There is another Malaysian sailing ship with a dark-coloured hull. It's bigger than the Tunas Samudera. I can't remember the name though.

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    Unicus Ac Immortalis II Dark Avenger's Avatar
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    [*******blue]Hellenic Navy Ship [/COLOR][*******blue]Ευγένιος Ευγενίδης (Eugenios Eugenidis)[/COLOR]
    [*******red]http://www.hellenicnavy.gr/evgenidhs_en.asp[/COLOR]



    [*******blue]Τριήρης Ολυμπιάς (Trireme Olympias)[/COLOR]
    [*******red]http://www.hellenicnavy.gr/trihrhs_en.asp[/COLOR]


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    Italian Amerigo Vespucci










    The Palinuro



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    Statsraad Lemkuhl






    Christian Radich

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    Member Nick_Karatzides's Avatar
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    Default Hellenic Navy - Trireme "Olympias"

    [CENTER][*******Red][SIZE=3]Hellenic Navy[/SIZE]
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    [*******Red]HN trireme "Olympias"[/COLOR][*******Red]
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    Click on the thumnail to maximize original size



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    [LEFT]The above pictures can also found as a wallpapers, into the Hellenic Navy official site HERE and HERE.

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    [SIZE=3] History brief of HN trireme "Olympias"[/SIZE]


    Construction works for the HN trireme of "[*******DarkRed]Olympias[/COLOR]" began in Greece in May 1985 and was finished in July 1987. Built of the reconstructed Athenian trireme, named "[*******DarkRed]Olympias[/COLOR]" in a shipbuilder in Piraeus and financed by Frank Welsh (a Suffolk banker, writer and trireme enthusiast), advised by historians J. S. Morrison and John F. Coates and informed by evidence from underwater archaeology. The drawings for her manufacture were provided by the '[*******DarkRed]Trireme trust[/COLOR]' of Britain. Initially, the trireme was used as part of an experimental archeological project, in order for scientists to determine the sailing characteristics (speed, etc. ) and her strength. Finally, battle tactics and living conditions inside the vessel were as well examined.

    Crewed by 170 volunteer oarsmen and oarswomen, the HN trireme of "[*******DarkRed]Olympias[/COLOR]" achieved 9 knots (17 km/h) in 1988. These results, achieved with inexperienced crew, suggest that the ancient writers were not exaggerating about straight-line performance. In addition, the HN trireme of "[*******DarkRed]Olympias[/COLOR]" was able to execute a 180 degree turn in one minute and in an arc no wider than two and one half (2.5) ship lengths.

    Information concerning the vessel's construction and tests that were followed, can be found in Commander's S. Platis H.N. relative article, published in volume 458 of the Naval Review publication. Additional information can be found in "[*******DarkRed]The trireme trials 1988, report on the Anglo - Hellenic sea trials of Olympias by J.F. Coates, S.K. Platis, J.T. Shaw[/COLOR]", published by Oxbow Books.

    Due to trireme's often use, when she was transported in Britain in 1993, in order to be presented in events about the 2500 years since the beginning of Democracy and the way the trireme was designed and constructed, several damages were caused to her craft. Large scale repairing, from the summer of 1995 untill the autumn of 1996, rectified the previous damages. In 1997, the Naval Supreme Court designed that the trireme should be used as an exhibit and not for sailing. Trireme was transported in Naval tradition park in Trokantero, where it remained as exhibit. In 1999 it was detected that the degree of the damages had grew.

    In 2002, Elefsis Shipyards offered to undertake the repair of the trireme, free of charge. The Hellenic Navy accepted the offer and the trireme was transported in Elefsis Shipyards. The works of repairing included the total replacement of timber in the hull of the ship and the enhancement of her stiffness. Modern ways of ship's construction were used to connect and make the timber waterproof, in order to ensure the longevity of the ship. Additionally, the timber in 01 deck was replaced and the masts as also the steering wheel were repaired. The HN trireme of "[*******DarkRed]Olympias[/COLOR]" was launched in May 14 2004 and remained in Elefsis Shipyards for 10 days for waterproof test. The Hellenic Navy equiped the trireme and performed stability tests. Finally, the vessel was delivered to Municipality of Paireus, which manned the ship and prepared her properly for the Olympic Flame's transportation. In 2004 the HN trireme of "[*******DarkRed]Olympias[/COLOR]" was used ceremonially to transport the Olympic Flame from the port of Keratsini to the main port of Piraeus as the Olympic Torch Relay entered its final stages in the runup to the 2004 Summer Olympics opening ceremony.

    The builders of the reconstruction project considered that it effectively proved conclusively what had previously been in doubt, that Athenian triremes were arranged with the crew positioned in a staggered arrangement on three levels with one person per oar. This would have made optimum use of the available internal dimensions. However since modern humans are on average approximately 2 inches (6 cm) taller than Ancient Greeks (and the same relative dimensions can be presumed for oarsmen and other athletes), the construction of a craft which followed the precise dimensions of the ancient vessel led to cramped rowing conditions and consequent restrictions on the modern crew's ability to propel the vessel with full efficiency, which perhaps explains why the ancient speed records stand unbroken.

    Click HERE to learn more about ancient Greek triremes and HERE to learn about Battle of Salamis on September 480 BC.
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    Last edited by Nick_Karatzides; 11-16-2006 at 03:48 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Combatbookworm View Post
    [*******black][FONT=Times New Roman]When I visited Sweden, I went and checked out that famous ship that sank after only sailing 200 meters out of the harbour. Was a very cool museum, and interesting story[/FONT][/COLOR]
    hehe yeah, maybe not the best ship we built over the centuries :P

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